Blaenavon

BLAENAVON, a parochial chapelry, chiefly in the parish of Llanover, division and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 5 miles (S. W.) from Abergavenny. The village, which has of late assumed the appearance of a thriving town, is situated in a mountainous district, near the source of the Avon Lloyd, whence it derives its name; many of the houses are excavated in the solid rock. The neighbourhood abounds with iron-ore, coal, and limestone. Iron-works on an extensive scale, belonging to the Blaenavon Company, were completed in 1789, since which they have been progressively increasing: the greater portion of the pig-iron is conveyed by means of a canal and a tramroad to Newport, whence it is exported; and another portion, together with iron, coal, and limestone, is sent to Llanfoist, for supplying Abergavenny, Hereford, &c., on the same conveyance, round the Blorange mountain and down its declivities, by means of an inclined plane. A customary market is held on Saturday. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £114; patrons, the Blaenavon Company. There are two places of worship for Baptists; and for Presbyterians, and Calvinistic, Primitive, and Wesleyan, Methodists, one each. Near the iron-works stands a spacious free school, on the national plan, endowed in 1816 by Mrs. Hopkins.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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