Blackley

BLACKLEY, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Manchester, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 3½ miles (N. N. E.) from Manchester, on the road to Middleton and Rochdale; containing 3202 inhabitants. It comprises about 1000 acres; the surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque and beautiful. The population is employed in weaving, bleaching, and dyeing cotton and silk; the silk-dye works of Messrs. Louis and Michael Delaunay are among the establishments that are carried on here. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150, with a house built in 1838; patrons, the Dean and Canons of the Cathedral of Manchester, to whom a rent-charge of £203. 11. 4. per annum has been lately assigned in lieu of tithes. The chapel, dedicated to St. Peter, was previously to the Reformation a domestic chapel belonging to Blackley Hall, and, after a period of disuse, was purchased by the inhabitants, in 1610; it was rebuilt in 1844, at a cost of £3300, raised by subscription and public grants, and is in the early English style, with a square tower. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Unitarians. A school has an endowment of £5 per annum: in 1838, Miss Alsop, of Litchford Hall, founded another, and endowed it with £60 per annum; and a national school was built at Crab Lane in 1842.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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