Binfield (All Saints)

BINFIELD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Easthampstead, hundred of Cookham, county of Berks, 3 miles (N. W.) from Bracknell; containing 1242 inhabitants. The parish comprises 3218a. 30p., of which 1660 acres are arable, 1275 meadow, and 282 woodland; and is situated in the midst of the tract called the Royal Hunt, in Windsor Forest. It is distinguished as the residence of Pope, who lived with his father in the village, where, at the age of sixteen, he composed his earliest poems; and in a retired part of the forest, consisting entirely of beech-trees, on the edge of a common within half a mile of the house, is a large tree on the trunk of which, about twelve feet from the ground, was inscribed by George, Lord Lyttelton, in capital letters, "here pope svng,"—which inscription is annually renewed. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 17. 1., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £800, and there are 20 acres of glebe. The church has portions in different styles: the north entrance is Norman; a few windows are early English, but most of them, with the tower and south doorway, are of the decorated English style; one large window is of a later character. Mrs. Macaulay, the historian, is buried here. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a national school has an endowment of £37. 15. per annum, arising from land. On the summit of a hill, near Binfield Place, are the remains of a very large encampment defended by a double ditch, named "Cæsar's Camp," and supposed to have been occupied by Julius Cæsar in his invasion of Britain. About half a mile to the south of this camp is a raised road ninety feet wide, with a trench on each side, pointing in a direction from east to west, and called the "Devil's Highway."

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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