Biddulph (St. Lawrence)

BIDDULPH (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Congleton, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 3¼ miles (S. E. by. S.) from Congleton; containing 2314 inhabitants. It comprises 5200 acres, of which 310 are open common; the surface is elevated, and the soil is in excellent cultivation: the river Trent has its source in the uorthern part, under a high rocky ridge called Mole Cop. The parish is divided into the four hamlets of Over Biddulph or Overton, Middle and Nether Biddulph, and Knypersley; it abounds in coal, has several quarries of hard and durable stone, and contains manufactories for cotton and earthenware, and iron-works. In 1837 an act was obtained for making a new road hence to Congleton. Biddulph Hall, at the north end of the parish, was anciently the residence of the Biddulph family: Knypersley Hall was the seat of a family of that name, and afterwards of the Gresleys, and is now the property and residence of J. Bateman, Esq. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 9. 8.; patron and impropriator, Mr. Bateman. The great tithes have been commuted for £180. 8., and the vicarial for £90; the glebe consists of 34 acres. The church was an ancient edifice, but has lately been rebuilt, with the exception of the tower, at an expense of £2000. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans on Biddulph Moor; and a school is endowed with about £14 per annum. Here are the ruins of a Druidical temple, and near them the remains of three curious caves excavated in the solid rock.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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