Berrow (St. Faith)

BERROW (St. Faith), a parish, in the union of Upton-On-Severn, and in a detached part of the Lower division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, locally in the Lower division of the hundred of Pershore, Upton and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 7 miles (W.) from Tewkesbury; containing 480 inhabitants. This beautiful parish, about a mile in breadth, extends in an eastern direction three miles from the summit of Raggedstone hill or the Gloucester beacon, and from the Keysand hill, which latter forms the southern limit of the Malvern range. There is a sudden descent for a quarter of a mile to the foot of the hill, whence the country is undulated, with here and there deep narrow ravines alternating with low flat ridges or terraces of considerable extent; the entire surface, dotted with fruit and forest trees, presenting to the eye a varied landscape. At the western extremity of the parish, where it touches the parishes of Eastnor and Bromsberrow, the three counties of Worcester, Hereford, and Gloucester unite. The area is about 2100 acres, whereof four-tenths are arable, five-tenths pasture, and onetenth woodland with 72 acres of common or waste: the soil is a rich loam, but the system of cultivation might be much improved, and a better mode of drainage adopted. Quarries of limestone and roadstone are wrought in the parish. The road between Tewkesbury and Ledbury passes near its northern border. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £7. 18. 4.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Worcester. The tithes have been commuted for £350, of which £40 are paid to the incumbent, whose total income is £100: there are 44 acres of glebe land; and a cottage named the Vicarage, with a rood of garden ground attached. The church is a small building in the decorated and later English styles, and consists of a chancel, nave, and south aisle, with a western tower, and north porch; the chancel, which is of good proportions, has been built since the erection of the nave: the edifice will afford accommodation to about 250 persons. A national school, taught by a mistress, has just been established.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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