Belmont

BELMONT, an ecclesiastical parish, in the parish and union of Bolton, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 5 miles (N. N. W.) from Bolton, on the road to Preston; containing about 3000 inhabitants. This parish has been formed of the upper part of the township of Sharples, under the act 6 and 7 Victoria, cap. 37. The land is mountainous and moory, and abounds in game; there are thin veins of coal, and some excellent granite and freestone. The river Eagley rises in the vicinity. The population is chiefly employed in a large cotton-mill, in print-works, and a paper-mill. A reservoir here covers a space of 100 acres: a mile further down the hill is another, extending over 50 acres; and still further down, are two smaller ones. They were erected at a cost of £80,000, by a company, for the supply of the town of Bolton, and the mills: the supply, altogether, is three millions of gallons per day. The living is in the patronage of the Rev. Charles Wright, of Hill Top, who is the owner of the parish; net income, £150, with a house. The church, dedicated to St. Thomas, was built in 1847, at the sole expense of the patron.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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