Beeston

BEESTON, a township, in the parish of Bunbury, union of Nantwich, First division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 3¾ miles (S. S. W.) from Tarporley; containing 428 inhabitants. This place takes its name from a castle founded by Ranulph de Blundeville, about 1220, and which was made a royal garrison in the war between Henry III. and the confederate barons. In 1643, the castle was held by a detachment of the parliamentarian forces, but was subsequently taken by the royalists, who, after sustaining a protracted siege in 1645, were compelled, from want of provisions, to surrender it to the parliamentarians, by whom it was demolished early in the following year. The remains occupy an eminence overlooking the Vale Royal, and include part of a tower which guarded the principal entrance to the inner court, flanked by semicircular bastions, and surrounded by a moat excavated in the solid rock: the outer walls were defended by eight round towers irregularly placed, and now covered with ivy. The township comprises 1921 acres, the soil of which is light and clayey; it is the property of J. Tollemache, Esq. The Beeston station of the Chester and Crewe railway is exactly midway between the two termini, being 10½ miles from each. Of the ancient mansion of the Beeston family, who long resided here, there are but small remains.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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