Beaudesert (St. Nicholas)

BEAUDESERT (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Stratford-upon-Avon, Henley division of the hundred of Barlichway, S. division of the county of Warwick, ½ a mile (E.) from Henley; containing 205 inhabitants. This place derives its name from a strong castle erected here soon after the Conquest by Thurstane de Montfort, which, from the beauty of its situation, was called Beldesert, and continued the chief seat of his descendants for several ages, but was probably either demolished or suffered to go to ruin about the time of the war between the houses of York and Lancaster, that the contending parties might not take advantage of it in their military operations. The parish comprises 1242a. 2r. 19p., of which 586 acres are arable; it is almost entirely surrounded by a range of hills, and is intersected by the Birmingham road: the soil is tolerably good, and consists principally of clay and marl. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 16. 0½., and in the gift of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £170, and the glebe consists of 141 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is partly Norman, and partly in the early English style, with a richly ornamented Norman arch between the nave and the chancel. The Rev. Richard Jago, a poet of some note, was born here in 1715, during the incumbency of his father.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z