Beaconsfield (All Saints)

BEACONSFIELD (All Saints), a market-town and parish, in the union of Amersham, hundred of Burnham, county of Buckingham, 36 miles (S. E. by S.) from Buckingham, and 23¼ (W. by N.) from London; containing 1732 inhabitants. This parish comprises 4548a. 11p., of which 3568 acres are arable and meadow land, 778 woodland, and 172 road and waste. The town, which occupies 29 acres, is situated on a hill, and is supposed to have derived its name from a beacon formerly erected there; it consists of four streets, which meet in a convenient market-place in the centre, and the houses are in general well built, of handsome appearance, and amply supplied with water. The environs, in which there are some handsome seats, abound with beautiful scenery, and the air is remarkably salubrious. The market is on Thursday; the fairs, chiefly for horses, horned-cattle, and sheep, are held on Feb. 13th and Holy-Thursday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26. 2. 8½.; net income, £545; patrons, the President and Fellows of Magdalene College, Oxford. The church is an ancient building of stone and flint, with a tower, and contains a mural tablet to the memory of Edmund Burke, who died at his seat called Gregories, in the parish, and was interred here: in the churchyard is a monument of white marble, to the memory of Edmund Waller, the poet, who died Oct. 21st, 1687. There is a meeting-house for Independents.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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