Barton-Bendish

BARTON-BENDISH, a parish, in the union of Downham, hundred of Clackclose, W. division of Norfolk, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Stoke-Ferry; containing 455 inhabitants. This place derives the affix to its name from a dyke called Bendish, constructed here by the Saxons as a boundary line to the hundred; it formerly consisted of the three parishes of St. Andrew, St. Mary, and All Saints, the two latter of which have been consolidated. The whole comprises 4126a. 24p., whereof 3316 acres are arable, 450 meadow and pasture, and the remainder fen and waste. The living of St. Andrew's is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14, with a net income of £260, and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes were commuted in 1777 for 308 acres of land, and the glebe comprises 26 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the early and later English styles, with a square embattled tower, and a south porch in the Norman style. The livings of St. Mary's and All Saints' form a rectory, valued at £11, with a net income of £300, and in the gift of Sir H. Berney, Bart.: the tithes were commuted for 320 acres of land, and the glebe comprises 10 acres, with a house. The church of St. Mary is chiefly in the early English style, with a small belfry, the tower having fallen in the reign of Anne: of the church of All Saints there are no remains. In the hamlet of Eastmore was anciently a chapel, dedicated to St. John the Baptist. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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