Barton (St. Mary and St. Cuthbert)

BARTON (St. Mary and St. Cuthbert), a parish, in the union of Darlington, wapentake of Gilling-East, N. riding of York, 5 miles (S. W.) from Darlington; containing, with the township of Newton-Morrell and part of Stapleton, 631 inhabitants, of whom 567 are in the township of Barton. This parish formerly comprised the chapelries of St. Mary and St. Cuthbert, together forming the township of Barton, and both perpetual curacies, the latter in the patronage of the Vicar of St. John's, Stanwick, and the former in that of the Vicar of Gilling. In 1840, the churches being in a dilapidated condition, the two curacies were consolidated into one benefice, and a new church was erected by subscription. The parish is on the road from Richmond to Darlington, and comprises about 2900 acres, of which 2335 are in the township of Barton; about two-thirds of the land are arable and in profitable cultivation, and the remainder meadow and pasture, with a small portion of woodland. The village is pleasantly situated on the banks of a small rivulet, and has an ancient cross in the centre. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the alternate patronage of the Vicars of Stanwick and Gilling, with a net income of £120; impropriators, John Allan, Esq., of Blackwell, and others. The great tithes have been commuted for £125, and those of the incumbent of Gilling for about £75; 23½ acres of glebe here are attached to the benefice of Easby, and 37½ belong to that of Gilling. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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