Aughton (All Souls)

AUGHTON (All Souls), a parish, partly in the union of Howden, and partly in that of Pocklington, Holme-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; containing, with the chapelry of East Cottingwith and the township of Laytham, 634 inhabitants, of whom 217 are in the township of Aughton, 8½ miles (N. N. W.) from Howden. The parish is situated on the left bank of the navigable river Derwent, and presents a tolerably level surface. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4; net income, £90, with a glebe-house erected in 1839 by the Rev. John Earle, incumbent; patron, James Fletcher, Esq. The church, the chancel of which was rebuilt in 1839, has a low embattled tower, built by Christopher, son of the unfortunate Robert Aske who was beheaded at York in the reign of Henry VIII., 1537, as a principal in the insurrection called the "Pilgrimage of Grace," occasioned by the suppression of the monasteries. On the chancel floor is a fine brass slab, on which are graven the effigies of Richard Aske and his lady, who died in the fifteenth century. Near the east bank of the river Derwent the moats and trenches of an ancient castle are still visible; and in the vicinity of the church is a large mound of earth, the site of the castellated mansion of the Aske family.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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