Aughton (St. Michael)

AUGHTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Ormskirk, hundred of West Derby, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 2 miles (S. W.) from Ormskirk, on the road to Liverpool; containing 1560 inhabitants. "Achetun" was held before the Conquest by Uctred, the Saxon proprietor of Dalton and Skelmersdale; the manor, or parts of it, subsequently came to the families of Acton or Aughton, Bradshagh, and Scarisbrick, and more recently to the families of Hesketh, Molyneux, and Plumbe, which last assumed in 1824, in addition to their own, the arms and name of Tempest. The parish comprises 3943a. 14p. of titheable land, whereof 1534 acres are arable, 900 meadow, 1492 pasture, 9 wood, and 8 glebe: Aughton Moss, which contains several hundred acres, not titheable, was inclosed in 1814. From the elevated situation of the parish, principally upon an extended eminence declining from Ormskirk to the south of Aughton church, it commands an extensive view of the country around. The Sudell, a tributary of the Alt, has its source here, dividing Aughton and Lydiate, and joining the Alt below the latter; a rivulet named Meer brook, also, separates the parish from the town of Ormskirk. The Liverpool, Ormskirk, and Preston railway passes through. The estate of Moor Hall, the property of John Rosson, Esq., was in the possession of the Stanleys, of Hooton, at a very remote period: in 1566, Peter Stanley, a younger branch of that family, rebuilt the hall in its present form, as stated in an inscription in old English raised letters over the porch. Aughton Old Hall, the ancient residence of the Aughtons, is now a farmhouse: New Hall, built in the 17th century, became the property of the Plumbe family. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 15. 5.; net income, £800, with a house: patron, John Plumbe Tempest, Esq. A portion of the tithes was commuted under the inclosure act for 35 acres of land, which, with the glebe, are of the annual value of £105. The church is an ancient structure, with a steeple in the centre. The Roman Catholic chapel here, built in 1767, and enlarged in 1823, is dedicated to the Blessed Virgin, and has a small endowment. There were formerly distinct traces of an intrenchment on Aughton Common, raised during the time of the Commonwealth; but the inclosure and the plough have combined to obliterate this vestige of intestine war.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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