Aughton

AUGHTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Halton, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 7 miles (N. E.) from Lancaster; containing 134 inhabitants. The lord of Halton exercises the manorial rights of Aughton. The Oliverian survey, made in June, 1650, recommends that Aughton should be added to Gressingham, owing to its distance from the parish church; but Robert Burton, in 1697, obviated this inconvenience by erecting and endowing a chapel and school here; and Mr. Lawson subsequently enlarged the endowment by the bequest of Lower Highfield. The chapelry is beautifully situated on the banks of the river Lune, which bounds it on the north; the scenery is mountainous, and the views extensive. There is stone for building purposes. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £110, with a house; patron, the Rector of Halton. The chapel, dedicated to St. George, is situated on a hill.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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