Atwick (St. Lawrence)

ATWICK (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Skirlaugh, N. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 2¼ miles (N. N. W.) from Hornsea; containing 300 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the east by the German Ocean, and comprises, with the manors of Arram and Skirlington, about 2186 acres, the soil of which is a stiff, but very fertile, clay. The surface begins to rise here in gentle undulations, and prepares the traveller for the hill and dale of the Wolds; the view towards Bridlington-Quay and Flamborough Head is beautiful. The village is situated near the sea, from whose encroachments it has occasionally sustained considerable damage; and it appears from measurements repeated for a series of years, that the sea gains from the land an average of three yards annually. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 7. 11., and in the patronage of the Lord Chancellor, with a net income of £149; impropriator, B. O. Mitford, Esq. The tithes for the township of Atwick were commuted for 26a. 3r. of land and a money payment of £15, under an act in 1769; and under the recent act, the remaining tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £210. 11., of which £107 for the hamlet of Arram are not payable when the land is in the hands of the owner, it having been the property of the dissolved abbey of Meaux. The church formerly belonged to the priory of St. Mary, Bridlington, to which it was granted by the family of de Roos in the 12th century; it is situated at the extreme end of the village, upon rather elevated ground, and consists of a nave and chancel, with a small square embattled tower of brick, which last was built in 1829. A school has an endowment of £35 per annum. In the centre of the village stands a rude stone cross of great antiquity, with a Latin inscription upon its base, now nearly defaced; and near the church is ground bearing evidence of having been the site of a religious house; also a series of fish-ponds, and a "holy well," the water of which is inexhaustible, and of the greatest purity.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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