Attercliffe

ATTERCLIFFE, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Sheffield, S. division of the wapentake of Stafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 1½ mile (N.E.) from Sheffield; containing 4156 inhabitants. This place is situated on the road from Sheffield to Worksop and Rotherham, and, together with the hamlet of Darnall, occupies a triangular area at the south-eastern extremity of the parish, bounded on the north by the river Don, and on the east by the small river Carbrook. The village is well built, and contains several handsome houses. The manufacture of steel is carried on extensively, and many of the inhabitants are employed in making anvils and agricultural implements: at Royds Mills is a gold and silver refinery. The old chapel, at the eastern extremity of the village, was erected in 1629 by Stephen Bright and William Spencer, Esqs., and others of the principal inhabitants, who endowed it with £10 per annum; it is now only used for the performance of the funeral service. Christ church, the first stone of which was laid by the Duke of Norfolk, assisted by Earl Fitzwilliam, in 1822, was completed at an expense of £14,000, of which £11,700 were granted by the Parliamentary Commissioners, and consecrated in 1826; it is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower crowned with pinnacles. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Sheffield. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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