Adderbury, East (St. Mary)

ADDERBURY, EAST (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Banbury, hundred of Bloxham, county of Oxford, 3 miles (N. by E.) from Deddington; containing, with the township of West Adderbury, and the hamlets of Barford St. John, Bodicot, and Milton, 2525 inhabitants. This place, in Domesday book called Edburgberie, probably derived that name from St. Edburgh, to whom many religious establishments in this part of the country were dedicated. In the court rolls of New College, Oxford, to which the lordship belongs, the name is written "Ebberbury;" and Henry de Knyghton relates that, by a council of bishops held at Oxford, a blasphemous impostor, condemned for assuming the office and pretending to the wounds of Christ, was crucified at "Abberbury," now Adderbury. The Parish comprises about 5900 acres, of which 1120 are in West Adderbury, 1240 in Bodicot, 800 in Milton, and 700 in Barford St. John. In the eastern part of the village stood a magnificent ancient mansion, belonging to the Duke of Argyll, afterwards the residence of the Earl of Rochester, and the remains of which are now incorporated with a modern seat.

The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £21. 4. 9½.; net income, £818; patrons and appropriators, the Warden and Fellows of New College. The church, situated on elevated ground, is a handsome cruciform structure in the early and decorated English styles, with a massive square tower strengthened by angular buttresses, and crowned with a pierced parapet, from within which rises an octagonal spire, having at the base four octagonal pyramids surmounted with vanes. Between the north transept and the east end of the chancel is an octagonal turret, crowned with battlements. The chancel, of beautiful proportions, and built by William of Wykeham, is lighted by windows of elegant design, lately restored: part of the ancient rood-loft, of exquisite workmanship, is remaining; also some fine tracery; and the whole of the interior is replete with rich details, interspersed with grotesque ornaments. In the hamlets of Bodicot and Barford St. John are other churches, both ancient structures, supposed to have been erected in the fourteenth century; and the old parsonage, now a farmhouse, retains much of its original character. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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