Ashton, with Stodday

ASHTON, with Stodday, a township, in the parish and union of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 3¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Lancaster; containing 185 inhabitants. Ashton is remarkable as the ancient seat of the De Courcys, out of which family it passed by marriage to John de Coupland, the hero of Neville's Cross. It was possessed in 1454 by the Lawrences, and came subsequently by marriage to the Butlers, Radcliffes, and Gerards; an heiress of the last named married James, Earl of Arran, created fourth duke of Hamilton in 1679. The township comprises 1350 acres of land; the surface is undulated, in some parts of high elevation, and the views of Lancaster Castle and town and of the surrounding country are beautiful. Ashton Hall, once the seat of the knightly family of Leyburne, and now the property of the Duke of Hamilton, is a quadrangular edifice, with a projecting wing to the east, and a square tower with angular turrets on the west; it was probably erected in the fourteenth century, but the numerous alterations and additions which it has undergone, have left little of the ancient baronial mansion. Stodday Lodge is the residence of William Assheton Cross, Esq.; in the gardens are some Roman antiquities. Walnut Bank is the picturesque residence of Thomas Pritt, Esq. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £22. A free school has an income of nearly £50 per annum.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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