Ashton, or Ashton-Upon-Ribble

ASHTON, or ASHTON-UPON-RIBBLE, with Lea, Cottam, and Ingol, a township, in the parish and union of Preston, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 2 miles (W. by N.) from Preston, and on the Fylde road, containing 710 inhabitants. Tulketh, in the township, was originally inhabited by a body of monks from the monastery of Savigny, in Normandy, under the immediate direction of Evanus, and who, on seating themselves here, chose him to be their first abbot; they afterwards removed to Furness. The township is washed by the river Ribble on the southern boundary, and comprises 3347 acres, whereof 801 are in Ashton, 1668 in Lea, and 878 in Cottam and Ingol; the surface is generally flat, and the soil clay and marl. The Lancaster canal and the Preston and Wyre railway pass through. Sir Henry Bold Hoghton, Bart., is lord of the manor of Ashton and Lea. The township has been formed into an ecclesiastical district, the living of which is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Preston; income, £100, with a house. The church, dedicated to St. Andrew, was built in 1836, and is a neat structure of stone, in the Norman style, with a tower and spire. The great tithes have been commuted for £235, and the vicarial for £13. There is a Roman Catholic chapel at Lea, built in 1800; the priest has a house and six acres of land. Excellent schools, built by subscription in 1846, with a residence for the master and mistress, are near the church; and Tulketh Hall, now a large school, stands on a hill overlooking the Preston marshes and the river Ribble. At Lea is a school endowed in 1784 by S. Neeld; the property consists of a farmhouse and 25 acres of land, producing £82 per annum.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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