Ashted

ASHTED, a district, in the parish and union of Aston, Birmingham division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick. This place, which adjoins the town of Birmingham on the north-east, and now forms a portion of that borough, consists of good streets of well-built houses, and some pleasant detached cottages and villas. About forty years ago it contained but a few hundred residents; the present population is very little, if at all, short of 25,000. At the extremity of Great Brooke-street are the Vauxhall gardens, which have lately been laid out very tastefully, and where concerts and displays of fireworks take place during the summer; in the same street are the barracks erected soon after the Birmingham riots in 1791, a handsome range of building, with a riding-school, hospital, and magazine, also a spacious area for the exercise of cavalry, and a smaller for parade. From its proximity to Birmingham, the hamlet participates in the trade and manufactures of that town; there are a large glasshouse, flour-mills, and various other works, with several wharfs on the line of the Birmingham canal. From Ashted verge four lines of railway, the London, the Gloucester and Bristol, the Grand Junction, and the Derby, of all of which, as they proceed from Birmingham, the Vauxhall gardens command a full view. Adjoining the barracks is an episcopal chapel dedicated to St. James, formerly the dwelling-house of Dr. Ash, from whom the hamlet takes its name: it was purchased for about £2700, and consecrated Sept. 7th, 1810; in 1830 it was repaired at an expense of £848, and in 1836 enlarged at a cost of £1300. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £210; patrons, the Hon. Frederic Gough and the Ven. Archdeacons Spooner and Hodson, as trustees. Here is a national school.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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