Ashford

ASHFORD, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 2 miles (N. W. by W.) from Bakewell; containing 950 inhabitants, and comprising 2562a. 1r. 13p. The village is pleasantly situated in a vale watered by the river Wye, over which are three stone bridges. Mills for sawing and polishing marble, being the first established for that purpose in England, were erected on its banks in 1786, and are supplied from the celebrated quarries of black marble in the vicinity. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £102; patron, the Vicar of Bakewell; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield. The chapel, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, is in various styles, part being early English; the first erection was a chantry, established here by Godfrey, son of Wenun Wyn, in 1257. There is a place of worship for General Baptists; another, originally founded by the nonconformist divine, William Bagshaw, styled "the Apostle of the Peak," has been subsequently used by different sects. A school endowed with £8. 13. 4. per annum, is further supported by a donation of £20 from the Duke of Devonshire. Edward Plantagenet, Earl of Kent, resided in a mansion near the church, of which there are no vestiges except the moat that surrounded it.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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