Ashbury (St. Mary)

ASHBURY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Farringdon, hundred of Shrivenham, county of Berks, 6¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Lambourn; containing, with the tythings of Idstone and Odstone, and the hamlet of Kingstone-Winslow, 819 inhabitants. It comprises 5600 acres, a large portion of which is appropriated to dairy-farms. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 8. 1½.; net income, £375; patron, the Bishop of Bath and Wells, who presents one of three candidates nominated by Magdalene College, Oxford. The rectory is a sinecure, valued at £30. 12. 6., and now in the hands of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; net income, £567. The tithes were commuted for land, valued at about £500 per annum, and a money payment, by an inclosure act in 1770; the glebe consists of 25 acres. The Roman road called the Ikeneldway passes near the village; and in the parish is an intrenchment named Alfred's Camp, near which are two barrows. Here are also a tumulus and cromlech, popularly designated "Wayland Smith," with which is connected a tradition, introduced by Sir Walter Scott in his romance of Kenilworth.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z