Acomb (St. Stephen)

ACOMB (St. Stephen), a parish, in the Ainsty wapentake, W. riding of York; containing 880 inhabitants, of whom 774 are in the township of Acomb, 2¼ miles (W.) from York, on the road to Leeds via Wetherby. This parish, anciently Ascham, comprises by measurement 1920 acres, and is bounded on the north by the river Ouse, on which is a small wharf for coal, lime, &c., adjacent to the Darlington railway; the soil is of a sandy and gravelly nature, and the air remarkably salubrious. Several mansions and villas here are occupied by families of the first respectability. The village has a neat appearance; the York and North-Midland railway passes near it, at Hob Moor. Part of Knapton, and also part of Dringhouses, are in the parish, and churchwardens are elected for these places along with those for Acomb. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £3. 9. 2.; net income, £109; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Isaac Spencer. The peculiar of Acomb formerly belonged to the Treasurer in the Cathedral of York, but was surrendered, with the rectory, to the Crown in 1547; and in 1609 was granted by James I. to Thomas Newark and his heir. The tithes of the townships of Acomb and Holgate were commuted for land and a money payment, by an inclosure act in 1774. The church, rebuilt in 1831-2 by subscription, is an elegant structure with a graceful spire, and, standing on the highest ground in the vicinity of York, has a very picturesque appearance; it contains 609 sittings, of which 212 are free. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists. Half a mile from the village is a hill, supposed to be the tumulus of Septimius Severus, who died at York.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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