Acle (St. Edmund)

ACLE (St. Edmund), a parish, in the union of Blofield, hundred of Walsham, E. division of Norfolk, 11 miles (E.) from Norwich; containing 864 inhabitants. This place, at the time of the Norman Conquest, became a fief of the crown, and was granted by William to Roger Bigod, who obtained for it the privilege of a market and a fair; and in the reign of Richard II. the inhabitants were exempted from all tolls and suits of shire and hundred, and invested with several valuable immunities. The parish comprises 3164a. 2r. 8p., a large portion of which is grazing land reclaimed from marshy ground; the uplands consist of a fine loamy soil, and are exceedingly fertile. The village is situated on the road from Norwich to Yarmouth, and on a gentle eminence rising from the banks of the navigable river Bure, over which is a stone bridge of three arches, and of great elevation. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20, and in the gift of Lord Calthorpe: the tithes have been commuted for £720, and there are about twenty acres of glebe, and a good rectory-house. The church, which is chiefly in the decorated style, consists of a nave and chancel, with a circular tower the upper part of which is octagon; the edifice was thoroughly repaired and beautified in 1834. At Weybridge, a small priory for Augustine canons was founded in the reign of Edward I., by Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk; the revenue at the Dissolution was £7. 13. 4.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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