Arncliffe (St. Oswald)

ARNCLIFFE (St. Oswald), a parish, partly in the union of Skipton, and E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, but chiefly in the union of Settle, and W. division of that wapentake, W. riding of York, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Kettlewell; comprising the townships of Buckden, Hawkeswick, and Litton, and the chapelry of Halton-Gill; and containing 834 inhabitants, of whom 182 are in the township of Arncliffe. This parish consists by estimation of 35,860 acres, nearly all in grass, including 5800 in Arncliffe township; and is bounded on the west by Pennygent, a mountain 2270 feet high, and on the north by Camm Fell, 2245 feet high. The district consists of two valleys, separated by an almost impassable mountain: one of these, called Langstrothdale, is watered by the Wharfe, which has its rise here; and the other, called Littondale, by the Skirfare, which forms a junction with the Wharfe at the bottom of the valley. The air is for the greater part of the year piercing, owing to the vicinity of the high hills just mentioned, which being often capped with snow, render the winds cold and sharp. There is a cottonmill in the village, but grazing forms the chief occupation of the inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; net income, £50, with an excellent glebe-house; patrons and appropriators, the Master and Fellows of University College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £483. 7. The church, with the exception of the tower, was taken down and rebuilt in 1805: the chancel has just been again rebuilt by subscription, and in the same style as the tower; and several windows of that character have been inserted in the body of the edifice. At Halton-Gill and Hubberholme are chapels, the livings of which are in the patronage of the Vicar of Arncliffe.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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