Arkengarth-Dale, otherwise Arkendale (St. Mary)

ARKENGARTH-DALE, otherwise Arkendale (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Richmond, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, 12 miles (W. by N.) from Richmond; containing 1243 inhabitants. This is a large moorland parish, the most interesting part of which is its picturesque dale, about eight miles long, and beautifully studded with rural hamlets, whereof the principal are Arkle, Booze, Eskeylith, Langthwaite, Whaw, Seal-houses, and Dale-head. It comprises by computation 14,256 acres; 3200 are pasture and meadow, 5 arable, 51 wood, 50 public road, and 10,950 common land. The district abounds in lead-ore, lying principally in high and bleak moors, in the vicinity of the Arkle rivulet, on whose south side the mountain called Water Crag rises 2186 feet above the level of the sea: the lead-mines are of great antiquity, some of them having been worked in the reign of King John, and they are still very productive. There are also extensive smelting-works, where more than 1000 tons of lead are made into ingots yearly; and two excellent slate-quarries are in operation. The road leading from Reeth, in Swaledale, to Kirkby-Stephen and Brough, in Westmorland, passes through the whole length of the parish. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Sir John Lowther, Bart., the impropriator, with a net income of £123, and a house. The present church, built in 1818, stands about half a mile from the site of the old edifice, and is a neat stone structure capable of accommodating from 500 to 600 persons; the cost of its erection, between £2000 and £3000, was defrayed, partly by money bequeathed by the late George Brown, Esq., and partly by the Rev. John Gilpin. At Langthwaite are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z