Appleton-upon-Wisk

APPLETON-upon-Wisk, a parish, in the union of Northallerton, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 7ΒΌ miles (S. S. W.) from Yarm; containing 600 inhabitants. The manor, at the time of the Domesday survey, was in the hands of the Conqueror, and was then styled Apeltune: it was afterwards granted by the monarch to Robert de Brus, lord of Skelton, who gave it to the abbey of St. Mary at York; and with that institution it continued till the Dissolution, when it was bestowed by Henry VIII. upon Sir Charles Brandon, Knt. The parish is bounded on the south by the river Wisk, and is about two miles in length from east to west, and a mile and a half broad. It comprises 1827a. 2r. 25p., of which 1101 acres are arable, 666 grass land, 27 wood, and 32 acres cottages, gardens, roads, and waste: the soil is a strong clay; and the fields, which adjoining the river are low, rise from it by a gradual and easy ascent towards the north. The manufacture of linen affords employment to about 100 of the inhabitants. The village is situated at the southern extremity of the parish, in the most westerly part of Cleveland, and is intersected by the roads between Richmond and Stokesley, and Northallerton and Yarm. The living is annexed to the rectory of Great Smeaton; impropriator, the Rev. J. Hewgill. The church is a small ancient building. There are places of worship for Independents, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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