Anglesey

ANGLESEY, a newly-erected watering-place, in the parish of Alverstoke, liberty of Alverstoke and Gosport, Fareham and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2 miles (W. S. W.) from Gosport. This interesting place occupies an elevated site at a small distance from Stoke's Bay, and nearly opposite to the town of Ryde in the Isle of Wight. The mild temperature of the climate, the beauty and variety of the surrounding scenery, the facilities for sea-bathing, and the goodness of the roads in its vicinity, have united to render it eligible as a watering-place, and it has already obtained a considerable degree of patronage, which is rapidly increasing. The first building erected was Uxbridge House, the seat of Robert Cruicksbank, Esq., the founder of the town; the first stone of which was laid in 1826, by the Earl of Uxbridge, for his father, the Marquess of Anglesey, from whom the place derives its name. The buildings consist of a noble terrace and crescent, and are situated within a spacious area inclosed with iron-railing, and tastefully laid out and ornamented with shrubs and flowers: within the inclosure is a fine elevated terrace-walk, commanding a view of the Isle of Wight, Stoke's Bay, the Mother Bank, and St. Helen's, with the shipping passing between Spithead and Portsmouth harbour. A commodious hotel was built in 1830, and being found too small for the accommodation of the increasing number of visiters, a house in the adjoining crescent was subsequently added to it: there are also reading-rooms and public baths, and a chapel of ease. The bay affords good anchorage for vessels: and a communication is kept up with Portsmouth harbour, the dockyard, and the other naval arsenals in the vicinity, by Haslar lake, a branch of the harbour.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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