Ancaster (St. Martin)

ANCASTER (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Grantham, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 6¾ miles (N. E.) from Grantham, on the road to Sleaford; containing, with the hamlets of West Willoughby and Sudbrook, 530 inhabitants. This place occupies the site of a Roman station, which Horsley conjectures to have been Causennæ, but the name of which has not been satisfactorily ascertained: it was formerly of much greater extent than it is at present, and various coins, foundations of buildings, vaults, and other relics of the Romans, have been discovered. During the civil war of the seventeenth century, the parliamentarian forces were defeated here by the royalists, under the command of Col. Cavendish. The parish comprises about 3000 acres, of which 2780 are arable, 200 pasture, and 14 woodland; the soil is light, and the surface well wooded. The celebrated "Ancaster" quarries (which are really in the adjoining parish of Wilsford) yield beautiful building-stone. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4., and in the patronage and incumbency of the Rev. Mr. Warren; net income, £151, arising from 120 acres of glebe. The church is an ancient and handsome building, with a tower surmounted by a tall slender spire; the arches on the north side of the nave are Norman, and those on the south of early English architecture; the font is singularly elegant. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists. Ancaster formerly gave the title of Duke to the family of Bertie.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z