Abram

ABRAM, a township, in the parish and union of Wigan, hundred of West Derby, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Wigan; containing 901 inhabitants. This township was originally called Adburgham, and afterwards Abraham, and gave name to an ancient family of landowners, of whom Gilbert de Abram and John Abraham are mentioned in the reigns of Henry IV. and Henry V. It comprises 1769 acres, of which 442 are arable, and 1327 pasture; the soil is chiefly clay. Several coal-mines are in operation; and the Duke of Bridgewater's canal skirts the township. There are some ancient seats, among which is Abram Hall, a moated brick mansion existing since the time of Henry VI. A district church dedicated to St. John has been built, towards defraying the expense of which the Incorporated Society granted £200: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Rector, with a net income of £146. A school-house was erected in 1824, at the cost of Mrs. Bevan, of Lowton House. The tithes have been commuted for £242.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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