Aldbrough (St. Bartholomew)

ALDBROUGH (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Skirlaugh, Middle division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York; comprising the townships of Aldbrough, Newton-East, and Newton-West, with part of Great and Little Cowden; and containing 1119 inhabitants, of whom 845 are in the township of Aldbrough, 11½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Hull. The township of Aldbrough comprises upwards of 4000 acres, of which two-thirds are arable, and one-third is pasture: the soil, generally, is strong and tenacious; and bricks and tiles are manufactured. The village, which is large and convenient, is pleasantly situated on an eminence about a mile from the sea, and includes some good houses and shops, and a large hotel, lately built, for the accommodation of visiters who resort hither for sea-bathing. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 15., and in the patronage of the Crown, with a net income of £350: the rectorial tithes for the lordship of Aldbrough were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1764. The church, the oldest in Holderness, is a large edifice, and contains a circular stone bearing this Saxon inscription: "Ulf commanded this church to be built for the soul of Hanum and Gunthral." Ulf was lord of the place, and had a castle here, every vestige of which, except the moat, has been destroyed. The chantry on the north side of the chancel contains a very splendid monument of Sir John de Melsa and his lady: the knight was governor of the city of York from 1292 to 1296, and a great warrior; his massive helmet is preserved. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Slight traces of a Roman road are discernible in the vicinity.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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