Achonry, Sligo

Historical Description

ACHONRY, a parish and the head of a diocese, in the barony of LENEY, county of SLIGO, and province of CONNAUGHT, 6 miles (W. S. W.) from Ballymote; containing 15,481 inhabitants. This place, anciently called Achad, Achad-Conair, and Achad-Chaoin, was granted about 530, by the chief of the territory of Luigny, to St. Finian, Bishop of Clonard, who founded an abbey here and placed over it his disciple St. Nathy, who was afterwards made Bishop of Achonry. In 1198, the French invaders marched from Castlebar through Tubbercurry, where a slight skirmish took place. The parish is situated on the river Moy, and on the roads from Boyle to Bellina and from Sligo to Swinford; and comprises 40,500 statute acres, of which, 19,827 are applotted under the tithe act: about 24,300 acres are arable and pasture land, and 16,200 are mountain and bog, much of which the peasantry are reclaiming. The land is generally good, and the system of husbandry is improving; there are quarries of excellent limestone and granite. The principal seats are Chaffpool, the property of J. Armstrong, Esq.; Muckalta, of Jones Irwin, Esq.; Achonry, of T. Rice, Esq.; Roadstown, of D. O'Connor, Esq.; Corsalla, of D. O'Connor, Esq.; Doornon, of H. Gray, Esq.; and Carrounaleck, of J. Gray, Esq. Petty sessions are held at Tubbercurry every Thursday. There are also weekly markets at that place and Bellaghy , and several fairs are held there and at Bellaghyand Curry, which see.

Transcribed from Samuel Lewis' A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1840

Civil Registration

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