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Redbay, Antrim

Historical Description

REDBAY, a hamlet, in the parish of LAYDE, barony of LOWER-GLENARM, county of ANTRIM, and province of ULSTER, 1¼ mile (S.) from Cushendall: the population is returned with the parish. This place is situated on the eastern coast, and on the new coast road from Glenarm to the Giants' Causeway; the shore is bold, and above the bay are some lofty cliffs of romantic appearance, on one of which are the interesting remains of Redbay castle, said to have been erected in the reign of Elizabeth. Underneath this castle is a spacious and singular cavern, of which the sides and the roof are formed of rounded silicious stones imbedded in a matrix of sandstone, commonly called pudding-stone, and differing entirely from those of the rocks in the vicinity; the opening is towards the sea, and through the arch which forms the entrance is a fine view of the sea, especially at high water, when it is agitated. In the vicinity is a small R. C. chapel belonging to the union or district of Cushendall.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1840 by Samuel Lewis

Directories & Gazetteers

We have transcribed the entry for Redbay from the following:


Land and Property

The Return of Owners of Land in 1873 for Antrim is available to browse.