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Athlumney, Meath

Historical Description

ATHLUMNEY, a parish, in the barony of SKREEN, county of MEATH, and province of LEINSTER,¼ of a mile (S. by E.) from Navan; containing 1148 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the river Boyne, by which it is separated from the parish of Navan, and over which are two bridges of stone; it is intersected by the roads leading respectively from Navan and Trim to Drogheda, and is skirted on the south by the mail coach road from Dublin to Enniskillen. An old castle, situated on the right bank of the river, was formerly the property of the Dowdell family, by whom it was destroyed, to prevent its falling into the hands of Cromwell. The remains consist of an extensive and irregular pile of building of an oblong form, with two projecting square towers apparently of more ancient foundation than the remainder, which, with its gabled windows, appears to be in the Elizabethan style. The parish comprises 2398 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act. The land is of excellent quality and mostly under tillage; and limestone abounds and is quarried to a considerable extent. Athlumney, the seat of P. Ponsonby Metge, Esq., is beautifully situated on the banks of the Boyne, commanding some pleasing views, and the demesne is well planted and tastefully embellished. There are extensive flour and oatmeal-mills on the river, and a flax-mill in which upon the average 260 men are employed. The Boyne navigation from Navan to Drogheda passes through the parish. The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Meath, and in the patronage of P. P. Metge, Esq., in whom the rectory is impropriate; the tithes amount to £270, of which £180 is payable to the impropriator, and £90 to the vicar. The church is in ruins, and there is neither glebe-house nor glebe: divine service is performed by the vicar, every Sunday evening, in a private house. In the R. C. divisions this parish is the head of a union or district, called Johnstown, comprising the parishes of Athlumney, Kilcarn, Follistown, Gerrardstown and Stalfordstown, and containing two chapels, situated at Johnstown and Walterstown; the chapel at Johnstown is a very old edifice, and it is in contemplation to rebuild it. There are two schools; one at Johnstown of 79 boys and 59 girls, and the other in Mr. Blundell's factory, towards the support of which that gentleman gives £18 per annum.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1840 by Samuel Lewis

Civil Registration

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Land and Property

The Return of Owners of Land in 1873 for Meath is available to browse.