UK Genealogy Archives logo

Lancashire, England

(Lancs)

Historical Description

Lancashire, a maritime and northern county, bounded on the N by Cumberland and Westmorland, on the E by Yorkshire, on the S by Cheshire, and on the W by the Irish Sea. A portion of it in the NW, forming Furness, is detached from the main body by Morecambe Bay and a tongue of Westmorland. The Duddon estuary for 8 miles forms the boundary with Cumberland; the watershed of the backbone of England, throughout a large aggregate, forms the boundary with Yorkshire; and the river Mersey, throughout its whole extent, forms the boundary with Cheshire. The shape of the county is exceedingly irregular. The S part is not far from being a four-sided figure of about 44 miles by 40; but the-N part consists chiefly of two irregular oblongs—the one contiguous with the S part, over a connecting distance of 10 miles, and measuring about 20 miles by 12—the other the detached section of Furness, measuring, with islands belonging to it, about 28 miles by 13 1/2. The total greatest length, from NW by N to SE by S, is about 87 miles; the greatest breadth is about 43 miles; the circuit, not including minor sinuosities, is about 295 miles; and the area is 1,207,605 acres. About 100 miles of the circuit line are low coast, marshy or sandy, and, 119,438 acres of the area are foreshore. The only islands are those at the SW of Furness, the largest of which is Walney. The surface of Furness is partly low seaboard, partly a series of fertile vales, but for the most part rises into the bold hills, the rugged mountains, and the romantic breaks and upland gorges of the Lake country, and culminates in the Old Man of Coniston, 2577 feet high. The surface of the other N oblong also rises from low seaboard to high interior, but has heights much less lofty and much less rugged, and is crossed, nearly through the centre, by the valley of the Lune, one of the most charmingly beautiful valleys in England. The W part, or nearly one-half of the rest of the county, is low and flat, chiefly fertile plain, showing indications of comparatively recent submersion by the sea, and interspersed with marsh land and mosses. The E part exhibits diversity of contour, includes much undulated landscape, rises into moor and mountain toward the boundary with Yorkshire, and contains, at or near that boundary, a number of summits ranging from 1545 to 1803 feet in altitude. All the E border is more or less upland, and it rises to greater heights about the middle than in the N and in the S.

The chief rivers are the Mersey, the Irwell, the Ribble, the Lune, the Douglas, the Wyre, the Leven, the Crake, the Duddon, and the Alt. The chief sea-indentation is Morecambe Bay, which occupies a very large area, and consists very greatly of foreshore. The chief estuaries are those of the Ribble and the Mersey, both very considerable, and the latter of vast value to navigation. The Lune is navigable to Lancaster, the Ribble to Preston, the Douglas to Wigan, and the Wyre for small vessels to Poulton. Much of the foreshore in the Ribble estuary has been reclaimed, and a plan was formed for reclaiming most of that in Morecambe Bay, but resulted in the reclaiming of only a small portion. All the long and beautiful lake of Windermere lies on the E boundary of the Furness section, and the lakes of Coniston and Esthwaite, together with some tarns, are in the interior of that section. Rocks of the upper Silurian formation constitute most of the Furness section. Rocks of the lower carboniferous formation, limestone and shale, constitute portions of that section toward the S, and a considerable portion of the tract between Morecambe Bay and the Lune. Rocks of the upper carboniferous formation, Yordale or upper limestone shale, constitute part of the country along the Lune, and a broad tract of country on both sides of the Ribble from the E boundary to within a few miles of Preston. Rocks of the same formation, chiefly millstone grit, constitute a great tract from Morecambe Bay around Morecambe, to the E boundary, intermediate between the two tracts of Yordale rocks, and constitute also a considerable tract on the E border, SE of Accrington and E of Shuttleworth. Rocks of the coal measures constitute a very large tract beneath and around the chief seats of manufacture, E of Ormskirk, north-eastward thence to the boundary around Burnley, eastward from Ormskirk to the boundary E of Rochdale, southward thence along the border, and past Manchester to the boundary with Cheshire, and southward on the W to the neighbourhood of Childwell. Rocks of the Trias formation, chiefly new red or Bunter sandstone, constitute the S extremity of the Furness section; constitute also a considerable tract southward from the neighbourhood of Garstang, past Preston and Ormskirk to the Mersey around Liverpool; and constitute further a broad tract, continuous with that, eastward along all the S border to the neighbourhood of Manchester. Alluvial formations constitute all the country between the new red sandstone formation and the sea, southward from the neighbourhood of Cockerham to the mouth of the Mersey. The coalfield may be divided into three portions, lower, middle, and higher. The lower portion contains three seams of coal, averaging about 4 feet in thickness; the middle portion contains two seams, averaging 3 feet in thickness; the higher portion contains about seventy seams, aggregately upwards of 100 feet in thickness. The county ranks next to Durham as regards the output of coal, and fourth in the production of iron ore. Hematite iron ore, lead, silver, copper, and slate are produced in Furness; lead and barytes, at Anglezarke and elsewhere; limestone at Silverdale, Clitheroe, Halewood, Leigh, and other places; whetstones at Rainford, and good building stone throughout great part of the county.

The soil of the low parts of the Furness section is various and generally good, but that of the high parts is chiefly peaty or moorish, and unfit for cultivation. The soil of the section E of Morecambe Bay, from the N boundary southward to the Ribble, includes clays, marls, and peat earth, but is chiefly a strong loam, and the low-lying portions of it form the richest corn lands in the county, while nearly two-thirds are disposed in dairy pasture. The soil of most of the large section from the Ribble to the Mersey is prevailingly a sandy loam, of considerable fertility, but only a small proportion of it is in tillage, and the greater part is laid out in grass. A limestone soil exists in scattered portions over much of the county, especially in the N, and possesses the properties usually found in limestone land. The climate is wet, having a rain-fall of from 30 to 40 inches, and drainage has not been practised to as great an extent as might have been expected. Peat mosses form a considerable aggregate in the SW and the S, the chief of them being those of Chat, Risley, Kirby, Halsall, and Pilling, and they are found, when drained, to rest on beds of rich marl. Agricultural practice, in general, is not in an advanced state. Oats, barley, carrots, hemp, and other crops receive attention. Cheese, similar to that of Cheshire, is made in some parts, principally around Leigh.

According to the census returns issued in 1893, the chief occupations of the people of the county were:—Professional, 53,276 males and 32,798 females; domestic, 11,219 males and 168,820 females; commercial, 219,326 males and 4766 females; agricultural, 55,103 males and 3340 females; fishing, 1263 males and 43 females; industrial, 899,007 males and 465,584 females; and "unoccupied," including retired business men, pensioners, those living on their own means, and others not specified, 195,252 males and 898,653 females; or a total in the county of 1,434,446 males and 1,574,004 females. The number of men employed in the leading industries was as follows:—Cotton and flax, 203,844; as general labourers, 84,690; miners, 81,480; iron and steel workers, 58,803; engineers, 44,002; and carpenters, 26,778. The chief occupations of women were—domestic service, with a total of 129,421; millinery and dressmaking, 49,451. There were also in the county 2819 blind persons, 1106 deaf, 1830 deaf and dumb, and 11,822 mentally deranged.

The commerce of Lancashire is necessarily very great, in connection with its numerous manufactures, and it possesses additional magnitude in connection with the imports and exports of a very large circle of the NW of England, particularly much of Cheshire, Derbyshire, Westmorland, and Yorkshire, and most of Staffordshire and Warwickshire. It is the chief seat of the cotton manufacture, and has nearly 400 coal mines under inspection, besides many important chemical works. St Helens is the seat of a crown, sheet, and plate, glass manufacture. Warrington is the centre of a very large tanning trade. Liverpool is the grand emporium, but Manchester, Preston, Barrow-in-Furness, Fleetwood, Lancaster, and other ports bear a share. Both canals and railways afford immense aid to traffic, and both have been developed here on a scale of great magnitude. The canal from St Helens to Liverpool, formed under an act of 1755, has usually, but erroneously, been regarded as the first canal with locks ever
constructed in Great Britain. The Sankey Canal, from St Helens to Warrington and Runcorn Gap, begun about the year 1750, really had precedence, though it began merely by the deepening of the Sankey Brook, and was afterwards, and very soon, changed into a proper canal. Yet, long previous to the making of this, the rivers Irwell, Mersey, Douglas, and others had been made artificially navigable, and the Irwell in particular, under an act of 1720, had been improved by means of cuts, locks, and weirs, as far as Manchester. The Bridgwater Canal, from Manchester to Runcorn Gap, with a branch to Leigh, was formed in 1758-65; and other canals, of such large aggregate as to traverse most parts of the county and-to form a great system of inland navigation between the Irish Sea and the German Ocean, were soon afterwards formed. The chief of these were the Ashton Canal, 11 miles long, joining one to Stockport and to Peak Forest; the Bury Canal, 10 miles long, with a branch to Bolton; the Manchester and Leeds Canal, 18 miles long, with connections; the Liverpool and Leeds Canal, 70 miles long, with branches to the river Douglas, to Preston, and to other places; and the Preston and Lancaster Canal, 26 miles long, with continuation toward Kendal. The Manchester Ship Canal, an undertaking of enormous magnitude, opened in 1894, connects Manchester with the sea, and it is expected to largely develop the trade of Manchester. (See MANCHESTER SHIP CANAL.) The Liverpool and Manchester railway, opened in 1830, was the first locomotive one of any note in the world. It was preceded, indeed, by experimental short lines elsewhere; it was preceded also by several of the old kinds of railroads within Lancashire itself; but it formed the first grand successful instance of railway with locomotives; it was both the type and the stimulus of all the other locomotive railways which have so marvellously changed the communications of the civilized world; and it has been followed, within Lancashire, by such a vast network of these railways as cannot be adequately understood without the aid of a map.

The administrative county of Lancaster contains 380 and the fourteen county boroughs thirty-four entire civil parishes. There are, besides thirty-five parishes situated partly in the county and partly in the boroughs, seven which are partly in other administrative counties. The ancient county includes 730 entire ecclesiastical parishes and parts of ten others. It is situated partly in the diocese of Carlisle, Chester, Liverpool,. Manchester, Ripon, and Wakefield. There are eighteen municipal boroughs. Four divisions of the ancient county—viz., N Lancashire, NE Lancashire, SE Lancashire, and SW Lancashire, are divided into twenty-three parliamentary divisions,. each of which returns one member to Parliament. The borough representation is as follows—Liverpool, 9 members ; Manchester, 6; Salford, 3; Blackburn, Oldham, Bolton, and Preston, 2 each; Ashton-under-Lyne, Barrow-in-Furness, Burnley, Bury, Rochdale, St Helens, Warrington, and Wigan, 1 member each. The total population of the administrative county and fourteen county boroughs is 3,906,721. The county has one court of quarter sessions, and is divided into thirty-four petty sessional divisions. Twenty-five of the municipal and county boroughs have separate commissions. of the peace, and the boroughs of Blackburn, Bolton, Liverpool (City), Manchester (City), Oldham, Salford, and Wigan have also separate courts of quarter sessions.

Lancashire is governed by a lord lieutenant, a high sheriff,. and a county council, consisting of 105 councillors and 35 aldermen. It is in the N judiciary circuit and in the N military district. The assizes for the N section are held at Lancaster, those for the S section are held at Liverpool and Manchester; quarter sessions are held at Lancaster, Preston, Kirkdale (for Liverpool), and Salford (for Manchester); courts of bankruptcy are held at Liverpool and Manchester, and county courts are held in all the large towns.

The chief seats in the county are—Knowsley Park, Heaton Park, Holker Hall, Croxteth Park, Worsley Hall, Latham. House, Haigh Hall, Atherton, Kenyon Peel Hall, Knowle, Ashton Hall, Middleton, New Hall, Old Hall, Bold, Rossall Hall, Trafford Hall, Gawthorpe Hall, Garswood Hall, Feniscowles Hall, Hazles, Aldcliffe Hall, Alkincoates, Alkrington, Allerton Tower, Alston, Apsley House, Arden House, Ashworth Hall, Astley Hall, Bank Hall, Bardsea Hall, Bigland, Birch House, Bispham Hall, Bleasdale Tower, Braythay Hall, Bradshaw, Brandlesome, Broad Clough, Broughton Tower, Burrow Hall, Capernwray Hall, Carr Hall, Castleton Hall, Chaddock Hall, Childwall Hall, Claughton Hall, Clayton Hall, Clifton Hall, Conishead Priory, Crosby Hall, Croston Hall, Cuerden Hall, Darcy Lever Hall, Downham Hall, Dunkenhaigh Park, Duxbury Hall, Ellel Hall, Euxton Hall, Formby Hall, Foxholes, Golborne Park, Hacking Hall, Hale Hall, Hamer Hall, Harrock Hall, Healey Hall, Halsnead, Hopwood Hall, Hornby Castle, Hulton Park, Huntroyde Hall, Hurst Grange, Ince Blundel Hall, Leighton Hall, Lytham Hall, Mitton Hall, Moreton Hall, Morleys Hall, Myerscough Hall, New Hall, Oakewood Hall, Ormerod House, Peel Hall, Pleasington Hall, Read Hall, Red Scar, Rufford Hall, Richmond Hill, Scarisbrick Hall, Shawe Hall, Sparth House, Speke Hall, Standish Hall, Stansfield Hall, Swaith Moor Hall, Symondstone Hall, Smithills Hall, Thurland Castle, Todmorden Hall, Towneley Hall, Turton Tower, Wardley Hall, and Widness Hall.

The territory now forming Lancashire was inhabited by the Brigantes and the Volantii; was included by the Romans in their province of Maxima Cæsariensis, and in the 6th century was the scene of various conflicts between the Britons and the Saxons. The northern part of it long lay included in the kingdom of Cumbria, the southern part became included in the kingdom of Northumbria, and the whole was not regularly occupied by the English till about 921, in the time of Edward the Elder. It was made an honour of the superior class of seigniories, and as such was given at the Conquest to Roger de Poictou. It soon passed by forfeiture into the hands of Stephen, afterwards king of England, was given by him to his son William; passed till the time of Henry III. through several eminent hands, was given with the title of Earl by Henry III. to his second son, Edmund Crouchback; passed to a descendant of Crouchback with the title of Duke, went with the title, by marriage with the first Duke's heiress, to John of Gaunt; was raised to a palatinate in favour of that possessor, passed through Henry of Bolingbroke to the Crown, was held by him as Henry IV., by Henry V., and by Henry VI., went into abeyance in connection with the last of these kings, and, by Act of Parliament in the time of Edward IV., was annexed permanently to the Crown. The Duchy of Lancashire was enriched at the Reformation with many estates of dissolved monasteries, and, besides much property in connection with the county palatine, has property also in twenty-one other counties, but the revenue is curtailed by leases granted by successive monarchs.

Some local names in Lancashire, though not nearly so many proportionally as in the southern counties, indicate the fact of occupation by the Romans. Ancient British names also occur, yet with comparative scarceness, as memorials of the ancient British people both before and after the Roman occupation. Saxon names likewise occur, but they too are comparatively scarce. Scandinavian names occur in only a very few instances. The local names in the aggregate afford much less distinctness of historical indication than in most other parts of England. The races of the present natives are evidently very mixed. A proportion is Celtic, but exists nearly apart or intermarries very little with the other inhabitants, and a proportion is Irish, by modern immigration, which went on rapidly increasing for some years, but received a check after 1861.

In 1323 the Scots under Robert Bruce ravaged Lancashire from the North as far as to Preston, and burnt that town. In the time of Henry VIII. Lancashire was in some measure agitated by the insurrection known as the Pilgrimage of Grace. In the civil wars of Charles I. many of the inhabitants took part with the king; many military operations and some conflicts took place within the county; Manchester was repeatedly contested by the belligerents, and eventually became the headquarters of Sir Thomas Fairfax; and Lancaster was alternately in the hands of the Royalists and the Parliamentarians. On 17 July, 1648, the Scots, under the Duke of Hamilton, and the Parliamentarians, under Cromwell, fought a sanguinary battle at Preston, when the former were routed with great slaughter; and three days afterwards the same armies met again at Winwick, with the same result. In 1651 the forces of the Earl of Derby were routed at Wigan by Colonel Lilburne, and soon afterwards the Earl himself was taken prisoner and beheaded at Bolton. In 1715 the troops of the Pretender took up their quarters at Preston, but being too few to stand their ground they soon laid down their arms. In 1745 the army of the young Pretender traversed the county both on their advance to Derby and on their retreat.

Roman stations were at Mancunium or Manchester, Coccium or Ribchester, Ad Alaunum or Lancaster, Bremetonacæ or Burrow, and Ad Alpes Peninos or Broughton. Roman camps occur at Westwick, Worston, and Twist. A Roman road went from Manchester to Ribchester, with a branch to Broughton, and to Lancaster and Barrow, and other Roman roads went toward Ilkley, Slack, Little Chester, and Chester. Roman coins and other Roman relics have been found at the Roman stations, at Burnley, and at other places. Old castles are at Lancaster, Dalton, Gleaston, Fouldry, Thurland, Hornby, Greenhaugh, Hoghton, Turton, and Belfield. Old abbeys are at Furness, Cockersand, and Whalley; old priories, at Burscough and Up Holland; and old churches, at Manchester, Winwick, Cartmel, Middleton, and Whalley.


Transcribed from The Comprehensive Gazetteer of England & Wales, 1894-5

Archives and Libraries

Lancashire Record Office,
Bow Lane,
Preston.
PR1 2RE
Tel: +44(0)1772 533039
Fax: +44(0)1772 533050
Email: record.office@lancashire.gov.uk

Cumbria Record Office and Local Studies Library, Barrow
140 Duke Street
Barrow-in-Furness
LA14 1XW
Tel:01229 407377
Fax:01229 894364
Email:Barrow Office


Church Records

We have an extensive collection of parish register transcripts available online. See the Lancashire parish registers page.

Ancestry.co.uk, in association with Lancashire Archives, have images of the Parish Registers for Lancashire online.


Civil Registration

For general information about Civil Registration (births, marriages and deaths) see the Civil Registration page.

List of Registration Districts in Lancashire from 1837 to 1974.


Directories & Gazetteers

The Historical Directories web site have a number of directories relating to Lancashire online, including:
Kelly's, Pigot, Slater, etc.

We have transcribed the entry for Lancashire from the following:


Land and Property

The Return of Owners of Land in 1873 for Lancashire is available to browse.


Maps

Old map of North Lancashire circa 1895 (Gazetteer of England and Wales)

Old map of South Lancashire circa 1895 (Gazetteer of England and Wales)


Newspapers and Periodicals

The British Newspaper Archive have fully searchable digitised copies of the following Lancashire newspapers online:


Parishes & places

Abbey Village
Abercrombie
Abram
Accrington
Adgarley with Stainton
Adlington
Aighton
Ainsworth
Aintree
Aldcliffe
Aldingham
Alkrington
Allerton
Alston
Altcar
Altham
Amounderness
Anderton
Angerton
Anglezark
Appleton
Arbury
Arkholme with Cawood
Arrad Foot
Ashton Green
Ashton in Makerfield, or Ashton le Willows
Ashton on Ribble
Ashton under Lyne
Ashton under Lyne Canals
Ashton with Stodday
Ashworth
Askam, with Ireleth
Aspull
Astley Bridge with Sharples
Astley or East Leigh
Atherton
Audenshaw
Aughton
Aughton (Halton)
Bacup
Bailey
Balderston
Bamber Bridge
Bamford
Bank Top
Banks
Bardsea
Bardsley
Barley with Wheatley Booth
Barlow Moor
Barnacre with Bonds
Barrow in Furness
Barrowford
Barton
Barton Moss
Barton upon Irwell
Baxenden
Bay Horse
Beckside
Bedford
Belmont
Bescar Lane
Bewsy
Bickershaw
Bickerstaffe
Bigger
Billinge Chapel End
Billinge Higher End
Billington
Bilsborrow, or Bilsborough
Birch
Birk Rigg
Birkdale
Birtle cum Bamford
Bispham
Bispham (Croston)
Black Lane
Blackbrook
Blackburn
Blackley
Blackpits
Blackpool
Blackrock
Blackrod
Blacksnape
Blackstone Edge
Blatchinworth
Blawith
Bleasdale or Admarsh
Blelham Tarn
Blind Tarn
Blowick
Bold
Bolton le Sands
Bolton or Bolton le Moors
Bootle
Borwick
Boulsworth
Bowland Bridge
Bowland Forest
Bradford
Bradley Fold
Bradshaw
Brandwood Higher End
Brantwood
Brasil Bank
Brathay
Breightmet
Bretherton
Bridgewater Canal
Briercliffe
Brierfield
Brindle
Brinscall
Broadfield
Broadgreen
Broadley Wood
Brock
Brookhouse
Broughton
Broughton in Furness or West Broughton
Broughton Mill
Brown Edge
Buersill
Bulk
Burbo Flats
Burnley
Burrow with Burrow
Burscough
Burscough Bridge
Burscough Town
Burton Wood
Bury
Butterworth
Cabus or Cabas
Caldervale
Cantsfield
Capernwray
Cark
Carnforth
Cartmel
Cartmel Fell
Castle Street
Castleton
Castleton (Rochdale)
Catforth
Catley Lane
Caton
Catterall
Chadderton
Chadwick
Chaigley
Charnock Heath
Charnock Richard and Welch Whittle
Chat Moss
Chatburn
Chatterton
Cheeseden
Chequerbent
Cherry Tree
Chipping
Chorley
Chorlton cum Hardy
Chowbent or Chewbent
Church Coniston
Church Kirk
Church Town
Claife
Claughton
Claughton (Garstang)
Clayton Bridge
Clayton le Dale
Clayton le Moors
Clayton le Woods
Cleveley
Cleveleys
Clifton
Clifton with Salwick
Clitheroe
Cliviger
Clock Face
Cockerham
Cockersand Abbey
Coldcotes
Coldhurst
Collins Green
Colne
Colton
Colwith Force
Conishead Priory or Coningshead
Coniston
Coniston Fells
Coniston Water
Copp
Coppull
Cowan Bridge
Cowlishaw
Cowpe Lench, Newhall Hey, and Hall Carr
Crank
Crawford
Crawshaw Booth
Crompton
Cronton
Crooke
Crossbank
Crossens
Croston
Croxteth Park
Cuerdale
Cuerden
Cuerdley or Cruerdley
Culcheth
Daisy Field
Daisy Hill
Dalton
Dalton (Burton in Kendal)
Dalton in Furness
Darcy Lever
Darwen
Daubhill
Davyhulme
Deane
Deepdale
Dendron
Denton
Didsbury
Dilworth
Dinckley
Ditton
Dixon Fold
Docker
Doffcocker
Dolphinholme
Douglas
Dow Crag
Down Holland
Downall Green
Downham
Droylsden
Dunnockshaw
Dunscar
Dunsop Bridge
Dutton
Duxbury
Eagley Bank
Earlstown
Easington
East and West Toxteth
East Broughton
East Crompton
Eccles
Eccleshill
Eccleston
Eccleston (Prescot)
Edenfield
Edgeworth
Egerton
Egton with Newland
Ellel
Ellenbrook
Elston
Elswick
Elton
Entwistle
Esthwaite Water
Euxton
Everton
Ewood Bridge
Exchange
Facit
Failinge or Falinge
Failsworth
Fairfield (Droylsden)
Fairfield (West Derby)
Fallowfield
Farington
Farnworth
Farnworth (Prescot)
Fazakerley
Fence in Pendle
Feniscowles
Ferry House
Filly Close
Fines Maximse et Flavise
Finsthwaite
Fishwick
Fleetwood
Flixton
Flookburgh
Folds
Ford
Formby
Forton
Fouldrey
Foulridge
Freckleton
Freshfield
Friar Mere
Fulwood
Gale
Galgate
Garstang
Garston
Gateacre
Gates Water
Gathurst
Gauxhoime
Gerards Bridge
Glasson
Glazebury
Gleaston
Glodwick
Golborne
Goldshaw Booth
Goose Green
Goosnargh
Gorton
Graithwaite
Grange over Sands
Great and Little Carleton
Great and Little Marsden
Great and Little Mearley
Great and Little Singleton
Great Crosby
Great Eccleston
Great Harwood
Great Heaton
Great Lever
Great Sankey
Greenacres Moor
Greenhalgh with Thirleton
Greenmount
Greenodd
Gressingham
Greyfriars
Grimsargh
Grindleton
Grisebeck
Grizedale
Grotton
Guide Bridge
Habergham All Saints
Habergham Eaves
Haigh
Haighton
Hale
Hale Bank
Halewood
Hall Fold
Hall Green
Hall or Hall in the Wood
Halliwell
Halsall
Halshaw Moor
Halton
Hambleton
Hamer
Hanging Birch
Hapton
Hardhorn with Newton
Harwood
Haslingden
Haughton
Hauigh
Haverthwaite
Hawcoat or Newbarns with Hawcote
Hawkshaw Lane
Hawkshead
Hawthornthwaite
Haydock
Hayside
Healey
Heap
Heapey
Heaton (Deane)
Heaton (Overton)
Heaton Chapel
Heaton Mersey
Heaton Norris
Hebden Bridge
Henheads
Henthom
Hesketh with Becconsall
Heskin
Hey
Heyhouses
Heyhouses on the Sea
Heyrod
Heysham
Heyside
Heywood
High Houses
Higham with West Close Booth
Higher Booths
Higher Walton
Hightown
Hindley
Hoddlesden
Hoghton
Holcombe
Holleth
Hollinfare
Hollinwood
Holme in Cliviger
Hoole
Hooley Hill
Hope
Hopwood
Hornby with Farleton
Horwich
Hoscar Moss
Hothersall
Houghton
Howick
Hull or Kingston upon Hull
Hulme
Hulton, Middle
Hulton, Over
Huncoat
Hundersfield
Hurst
Hurst Green
Hurstwood
Hutton
Hutton Priest
Huyton with Roby
Ightenhill Park
Ince Blundell
Ince in Makerfield
Inglewhite
Ingol
Inskip
Ireby
Ireleth
Irlam
Kearsley
Kellamergh
Kenyon
Kirkby
Kirkby Ireleth
Kirkby-in-Furness
Kirkham
Kirkland
Knott Lanes
Knowsley
Knuzden
Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway
Lancaster
Lancaster Canal
Lancaster Castle
Lane Ends
Lanehead (Ashton under Lyne)
Lanehead (Rochdale)
Langtree
Lathom
Layton with Warbreck
Lea
Lea Green
Lea Road
Leagram
Leck
Leece
Leeds and Liverpool Canal
Lees
Leigh
Levenshulme
Leverbridge
Levers Water
Leyland
Lickhurst
Lily of the Valley Islands
Lindal with Marton
Lindale
Lingholm
Litherland
Little Crosby
Little Bowland
Little Eccleston
Little Harwood
Little Heaton
Little Houghton
Little Hulton
Little Lever
Little Mitton
Little Sankey
Little Woolton
Littleborough
Littledale
Littlemoss
Liverpool
Livesey
Longridge
Longsight
Longton
Longworth
Lonsdale
Lostock (Barton upon Irwell)
Lostock (Bolton le Moors)
Lostock (Walton le Dale)
Lostock Hall
Lostock Junction
Lostock River
Love Clough
Low Quarter
Low Water
Low Wray
Lower Booths
Lower Catterall
Lower Darwen
Lower Holker
Lowick
Lowton
Lumb
Lund
Lunt
Lydiate
Lytham
Maghull
Mallowdale Pike
Manchester
Manchester, Bolton, and Bury Canal
Mansriggs
Marshfield
Marshside
Martinscroft
Marton
Mawdesley
Maypole
Medla with Wesham
Melling
Melling (Halsall)
Mellor
Mellor Brook
Mere Brow
Middle Patch
Middleton
Middleton (Lancaster)
Middleton (Winwick)
Middleton Junction
Midge Hall
Miles Platting
Milford
Milnrow
Molyneux Brow
Moorside
Moorside (station)
Morecambe
Morecambe Bay
Moses Gate
Moss Bank
Moss Side
Moss Side (Kirkham)
Mosshouses
Mossley
Mossley Hill
Moston
Much Woolton
Musbury
Myerscough
Nateby
Nelson
Nether Kellet
Nether Wyersdale
Netherton
New Barns with Hawcote
New Bury
New Hey
New Lane
Newbold
Newburgh
Newby Bridge
Newchurch in Pendle
Newchurch in Rossendale
Newchurch or Newchurch Kenyon
Newland
Newsham
Newton (Dalton in Furness)
Newton (Manchester)
Newton (Poulton le Fylde)
Newton (Whittington)
Newton in Cartmel
Newton in Makerfield
Newton Parliamentary Division
Newton with Scales
Newtown
Nibthwaite
Norbreck
Norden
North Lonsdale
North Meols
North Scale
North Scales
North Street
Oakenclough
Ogden
Oglet
Old Laund Booth
Oldham
Oldham, Ashton under Lyne, and Guidebridge Railway
Oldhams
Openshaw
Orford
Ormskirk
Orrell
Orrell and Ford
Osbaldeston
Osmotherley
Oswaldtwistle
Otterspool
Out Rawcliffe
Outgate
Outwood
Over Kellet
Over Wyersdale
Overton
Oxcliffe
Oxen Fell
Oxen Houses
Paddington
Padgate
Padiham
Parbold
Park
Park Bridge
Parkfield
Parr
Patricroft
Peak Forest Canal
Peasley Cross
Pemberton
Pendle Hill
Pendlebury
Pendleton
Pendleton (Whalley)
Penketh
Pennington
Pennington (Leigh)
Pennington Green
Pennybridge
Penwortham
Piccadilly
Piel Harbour or Piel Anchorage
Pilkington
Pilling
Pilsworth
Pimbo Lane
Platt Bridge
Pleasington
Portsmouth
Poulton Bare and Torrisholme
Poulton le Fylde
Poulton with Fearnhead
Preesall with Hackensall
Preese
Prescot
Prestolee
Preston
Preston Junction
Preston Road
Prestwich
Quarlton
Quernmore
Radcliffe
Rainford
Rainford Junction
Rainhill
Rampside
Ramsbottom
Ramsgreave
Raven Meols
Ravenhead
Rawtenstall
Read
Redbank
Reddish
Reedley Hallows
Rhodes
Rhodes Hill
Ribbleton
Ribby with Wrea
Ribchester
Ringley
Rishton
Risley
Rivington
Rixton with Glazebrook
Roa
Roby
Rochdale
Rochdale Canal
Roeburndale
Rookery
Roose
Rose Bank
Roseacre
Rossendale Parliamentary Division
Roughlee Booth
Royton
Rufford
Rumworth
Rusholme or Rushulme
Rusland
Sabden
Salesbury
Salwick
Samlesbury
Sandhills
Sankey Brook
Satterthwaite
Sawrey
Scales
Scales (Aldingham)
Scarisbrick
School Lane
Scorton
Scotforth
Scotland
Seaforth
Seathwaite
Sephton or Sefton
Sharples
Shaw
Shawforth
Shevington
Shireshead or Shirehead
Sholver
Shuttleworth
Silverdale
Simonstone
Simonswood
Skelmersdale
Skelwith
Skerton
Slyne with Hest
Smallbridge
Smallshaw
Smedley
Smithills
Smithy Bridge
Sollom
Sough
South Shore
Southport
Southworth with Croft
Spark Bridge
Speke
Spotland
Springvale
St Helens
St Michael on Wyre
Stacksteads
Staining
Stainton
Stalmine
Stand or Whitefield
Standish
Stanley
Stanner Point
Starling
Staveley
Stede or Stidd
Stoneclough
Stoneycroft
Stonyhurst
Stretford
Stubbins
Stubshaw Cross
Subberthwaite
Summerseat
Summit
Sunderland
Sutton
Sutton Oak
Swarthmoor
Sweet Loves
Tarbock or Torbock
Tarleton
Tarn Green
Tarnacre
Tatham
Tatham Fell
The Burn or Brun
The Calder (Blackburn)
The Calder (Calder Fell)
The Calder (Cliviger Dean)
The Cocker
The Conder
The Crake
The Cunsey
The Darwen
The Douglas
The Hyndburn
The Irwell
The Langden
The Leven
The Medlock
The Oaks
The Ribble
The Roch
The Spodden
The Wyre
Thingwell
Thornham
Thornley with Wheatley
Thornton
Thornton (Sefton)
Thornton in Fylde
Thornton in Lonsdale
Thurnham
Tilberthwaite
Tockholes
Todmorden
Tonge
Tonge with HauIgh
Tontine
Torver
Tottington
Tottington Higher End
Tottington Lower End
Towneley
Trawden
Treales, Roseacre, and Wharles
Tunstall
Tunstead
Turton
Twiston
Tyldesley
Ulnes Walton
Ulverston
Unsworth
Upholland
Upper Holker
Upper Rawcliffe with Tarnicar
Upton
Urmston
Urswick
Vauxhall
Vulcan
Walk Mill
Walkden Moor
Walmersley
Walmsley
Walney
Walsden
Walshaw or Walshaw Lane
Walton
Walton le Dale
Wardle
Warrington
Warton
Warton with Lindeth
Waterfoot
Waterhead
Waterloo
Waterloo (Sefton)
Wavertree
Weaste
Weeton
Welch Whittle
Wennington
Werneth
West Close Booth
West Derby
West Houghton
Westby with Plumpton
Whalley
Whalley Range
Wharles
Wheatley
Wheatley Carr Booth
Wheelton
Whiston
Whitechapel
Whitewell
Whitewell Bottom
Whittingham
Whittington
Whittle le Woods
Whitworth
Widnes
Wigan
Wilpshire
Windle
Wingates
Winmarleigh
Winstanley
Winwick
Wiswell or Wiswall
Withington
Withnell
Witton
Woodhouse Lane
Woodhouses
Woodland
Woodplumpton
Woolfold
Woolstenholme
Woolston with Martinscroft
Worsley
Worsthorne
Worston
Worthington
Wray with Botton
Wrayton
Wrea Green
Wrightington
Wuerdle with Wardle
Yarlside or Yarleside
Yate and Pickup Bank
Yealand Conyers
Yealand Redmayne
Yewdale
Map of North Lancashire
 
Map of South Lancashire