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Gloucestershire, England

Historical Description

Gloucestershire, an inland, but partly maritime, county of England; bounded, on the NW, by Herefordshire and Worcestershire; on the N, by Worcestershire and Warwickshire; on the E, by Oxfordshire; on the SE, by Berks and Wilts; on the S, by Wilts and Somerset; on the W, by the Severn's estuary and by Monmouthshire. Its outline is somewhat elliptical, extending from NE to SW; but is narrower toward the NE than toward the SW. Its boundary consists partly of the river Avon, the Severn's estuary, and the river Wye, but is mainly artificial. Its greatest length is 60 miles; its greatest breadth is 43 miles; its circumference is, roughly, about 156 miles—or, following sinuosities, about 245 miles; and its area is 795,734 acres; population, 599,947. About 10 miles of its boundary, along the Severn, is coast. The surface comprises three parts or sections, eastern, central, and western, or hill, vale, and forest. The hill section extends from end to end of the county; is in some parts 8 miles broad; bears the name of Cotswolds; has a mean height of between 500 and 600 feet, with culminating summits of 1086 and 1134 feet; and is partly open down, more largely enclosed sheep-walk, but includes many winding dales, and possesses much good land and pleasant scenery. The vale section also extends from end to end of the county; lies mainly along the river Severn; spreads from the foot of the Cotswolds, partly to the western boundary, partly to the Severn's estuary; includes the vales of Evesham, Gloucester, and Berkeley, together with all the low lands from Tewkesbury to Bristol, and consists chiefly of fine land, variously arable, meadow, and pasture. The forest section is much the smallest of the three, lies on the W side of the Severn, consists chiefly of the Forest of Dean, and is varied throughout with hill and dale. The chief rivers, besides the Severn, the Thames, the Chum, the Coin, and the Wye, are the Upper or Warwickshire Avon, the Lower Avon, the Frome or Stroud-water, the Windrush, and the Leadon.

A middle oolite, comprising coral rag, calcareous grit, and Oxford clay, forms a small part of the Cotswolds, around Lechlade; a lower oolite, comprising cornbrash, forest marble, Bradford clay, Bath stone, fuller's earth, and inferior oolite, forms most of the Cotswolds, and considerable adjacent parts of the vale; a lias, comprising sand, upper lias clay, marl stone, and lower lias clay and lime, forms the greater part of the vale eastward of the Severn; a trias, comprising new red sandstone and keuper marl, forms a small portion of the vale east of the Severn and south of Tewkesbury, and most of the vale west of the Severn; an upper carboniferous formation, consisting of the coal measures, constitutes two considerable tracts, the one between Wickwar and Bristol, the other in the Forest of Dean; a lower carboniferous formation, comprising limestone and shale, constitutes tracts in the neighbourhood of Thornbury, in the neighbourhood of Bristol, and around the coal measures of the forest; an old red sandstone formation constitutes the rest of the forest; and a tract of alluvium extends along the Severn coast-line from the neighbourhood of Northwick to the Avon. Building stone and limestone abound, and are extensively worked. The chief mineral products are coal, of which the annual output exceeds 1,200,000 tons; iron ore, of which the output is about 60,000 tons; and fire-clay, 5500 tons. The manufacture of pig-iron (including that produced in Wiltshire), is nearly 35,000 tons. Lead ore also occurs, a little zinc, traces of strontian, and small quantities of various rare minerals. There are mineral springs at Cheltenham, Clifton, Walton, and Gloucester.

The soil of the Cotswolds is, in most parts, a shallow, calcareous loam, on a stratum of rubble, but in the depressions and bottoms, and sometimes on the hills, a stiff clay. The soil of the vale is, for the most part, an uncommonly rich deep loam, in some places black, in others red, sometimes incumbent on compact rock, but generally incumbent on blue clay. The soil of the forest is chiefly sand, in some places peat, in other places a thin limestone debris, generally not very fertile, yet not unfavourable to certain kinds of cultivation. The hill or Cotswold section has undergone vast improvement since the 18th century, now comprises much arable and enclosed pasture land, which formerly was open down, carries on cultivation of corn, with produce of from 16 to 20 bushels per acre, barley, with produce of 32 bushels, turnips, sainfoin, and other crops; has sheep farms of from 200 to 1000 acres pastured by a native breed, and generally is characterized by harvests a fortnight later than in the vale, and by stone-wall enclosures. The vale is disposed variously in arable land and dairy land, together with orchards, is intersected with elm, willow, and thorn hedges, grows wheat (with produce of from 24 to 28 bushels), barley (with produce of 40 bushels), beans (with produce of from 20 to 30 bushels), oats, turnips, potatoes, and other crops; includes meadows along the Severn below Gloucester, yielding from 2 to 2 1/2 tons of hay per acre; maintains a good native breed of cattle, whose milk yields from 3 to 4 cwt. of cheese per year, and also excellent butter, and maintains likewise a variety of breeds, chiefly the Staffordshire and Herefordshire. Calves and swine are numerously fed, and the swine now are chiefly the Berkshire and cross breeds. An orchard exists on almost every farm, and cider and perry are largely made. The forest section is noted principally for its timber, and for an excellent cider apple.

According to the census returns issued in 1893, the chief occupations of the people of the county were:—Professional, 11,056 males and 9019 females; domestic, 2292 males and 41,702 females; commercial, 26,062 males and 495 females; agricultural, 26,625 males and 1048 females; fishing, 117 males; industrial, 91,074 males and 35,205 females; and "unoccupied," including retired business men, pensioners, those living on their own means, and others not specified, 34,582 males and 141,985 females; or a total in the county of 191,808 males and 229,454 females. The number of men employed in the leading industries was as follows:—General labourers, 14,604; agricultural labourers, 14,585; boot and shoe makers, 6935; and coal miners, 4394. The chief occupations of women were—domestic service, with a total of 31,566; millinery and dressmaking, 9464; tailoresses, 5032; boot and shoe making, 2245. There were also in the county 636 blind persons, 426 deaf, 330 deaf and dumb, and 2634 mentally deranged.

The woollen manufacture has been carried on in Gloucestershire for centuries, and is still of importance. Its chief seats are Stroud, Minchinhampton, Wotton-under-Edge, Dursley, Nailsworth Painswick, Stonehouse, Rodborough, Cam, and Kingstanley. The railway communications of Gloucestershire are excellent, and belong chiefly to the Great Western and Midland systems. The Gloucester and South Wales section of the former railway crosses the county from Swindon E to W, past Stroud to Gloucester, branching thence SW to Chepstow and South Wales. From Gloucester is a branch to Ross and Hereford, another to Cheltenham, and another to Ledbury, Malvern, and Worcester. From Bristol a branch proceeds to South Wales through the Severn Tunnel, meeting the line from Gloucester and Severn Tunnel Junction near Portskewet. Subsidiary branches are from Kemble to Cirencester, and to Tetbury; from Severn Tunnel Junction along the Wye Valley to Monmouth and Coleford; and from Cheltenham to Chipping Norton, connecting with the Oxford, Worcester, and Wolverhampton section and extending to Banbury. The M.R. traverses the county from N to S, entering at Ashchurch from Birmingham and Worcester, and 868 passing Cheltenham and Gloucester to Mangotsfield, where it branches off to Bristol and Bath. It has branches from Ashchurch to Tewkesbury and Malvern, and to Evesham, meeting the G.W.R. at the latter station; from Stonehouse to Nailsworth; from Coaley to Dursley, and from Yate to Thornbury. The Severn and Wye, Severn Bridge and Monmouth railway connects with the Midland at Berkeley Road, crosses the Severn by a great viaduct at Sharpness, and runs through the Forest of Dean to Lydbrook. The Midland and South-Western Junction railway runs from Cheltenham, via Andoversford, Cirencester, and Cricklade to Swindon, and thence to Andover, where it connects with the L. & S.W. system. A branch of the G.W.R. runs from Oxford to Lechlade and Fairford. A short line worked by the G.W.R. and M.R. runs from Bristol to Avonmouth. On the Somerset side of the Avon a short line, owned by the G.W.R., runs from Bristol via Clifton Bridge to Portishead. The canals are the Gloucester and Berkeley Ship Canal, the Stroudwater, the Thames and Severn, and the Hereford and Gloucester. The roads are abundant and good.

The county is divided for parliamentary purposes into five divisions, and also includes the parliamentary boroughs of Cheltenham and Gloucester, and the greater part of the parliamentary borough of Bristol, consisting of four divisions. The administrative county includes two municipal boroughs, exclusive of the county boroughs; has one court of quarter sessions and 24 petty sessional divisions. The boroughs of Bristol, Gloucester, and Tewkesbury have separate commissions of the peace and separate courts of quarter sessions. The county contains 342 entire civil parishes and parts of 7 others; the county borough of Bristol contains 21 entire civil parishes and parts of 2 others, and the county borough of Gloucester 13 entire civil parishes and parts of 2 others. The ecclesiastical parishes and districts in the county number 392, with parts of 10 others, and belong almost entirely to the diocese of Gloucester and Bristol. The chief seats are Badminton Park, Berkeley Castle, Stanway, Southam, Woodchester, Barrington Park, Hempsted Court, Kings Weston, Northwick, Sherborne, Stowell, Batsford, Barnsley, Flaxley Abbey, Toddington, the Elms, Highnam, Miserden, Seizincote, Witcombe Park, Daylesford, Hill Court, Ablington, Adlestrop, Admington, Bibury, BIaise Castle, Boddington, Bromsberrow, Cote, Down-Ampney, Estcourt, Gatcombe, Henbury, Hardwicke, Huntley, Kingscote, Leckhampton, Lydney Park, Lypiatt Park, Newark Park, the Priory, Radbrook, the Ridge, Sedbury, Tortworth, Wick House, Williamstrip, Wormington, and Prescott.

Gloucestershire is governed by a lord-lieutenant and a county council consisting of 60 councillors and 20 aldermen. It is in the Oxford judicial circuit, and in the Western military district. The assizes and the quarter sessions are held at Gloucester. Till 1885 the county returned four members to Parliament, in two divisions, East and West Gloucestershire, each division returning two; two were returned by each of the boroughs of Gloucester, Bristol, and Stroud; one each by the boroughs of Cirencester, Tewkesbury, and Cheltenham. By the Redistribution of Seats Act of 1885, the county was divided for parliamentary purposes into five divisions, each returning one member:—Mid or Stroud Division, Northern or Tewkesbury, Eastern or Cirencester, Forest of Dean, Southern or Thornbury. Bristol was divided into four single-member constituencies, Gloucester lost one member, and Cirencester, Tewkesbury, and Stroud were disfranchised. Almost the entire county is in the diocese of Gloucester and Bristol.

The territory now forming Gloucestershire was inhabited, in the ancient British times, by the Dobuni, The part of it east of the Severn was included by the Romans in their Britannia Prima, the part west of the Severn in their Britannia Secunda, and the whole of it eventually in their Flavia Cæsariensis. It was the seat of much warfare in the time of the Anglo-Saxon invasion; it became subject at the end of that invasion to the West Saxons, and it afterwards formed part of the kingdom of Mercia. It was for a time much harassed by the Danes under their general Gunnon or Gurmundus; it submitted quietly to the Norman conqueror; it performed distinguished acts in the subjugation of Wales; it took part with Queen Maud against King Stephen; it was much troubled in the time of Henry II. by incursions of the Welsh; it behaved conspicuously in the barons' wars under guidance of Gilbert de Clare, then Earl of Gloucester, and it was the scene of many skirmishes and fights, particularly at Bristol, Cirencester, Gloucester, and Tewkesbury, in the civil wars of Charles I. A noted event was the murder of Edward II. in 1327, at Berkeley Castle, and another was a sanguinary victory over the Lancastrians by the Yorkists in 1471 at Tewkesbury. Barrows are abundant in Gloucestershire, having been found at Upper Swell, Rodmarton, Uley, Ablington, Nympsfield, &c. Roman camps occur at Bourton-on-the-Water, Aust Ferry, Lydney, North Cerney, Oldbury, Sapperton, Little Sodbury, Woodchester, and other places. Roman stations were at Cirencester and Gloucester, and the Roman roads, Icknield Street, Ermine Street, the Fosse Way, and the Julian Way, traversed the county. The ruins of Roman villas have been found at Woodchester, Great Witcombe, Cirencester, Rodmarton, Bisley, Chedworth, and other places. Chief mediaeval castles were at Berkeley, Beverstone, Brimpsfield, Bristol, Cirencester, Dursley, Gloucester, St Briavels, Sudeley, and Thornbury. Great abbeys were at Gloucester, Tewkesbury, Cirencester, Winchcombe, and Hayles; priories at Hasledon, Horsley, and Stanley St Leonard, and interesting old churches at Bristol, Cirencester, Deerhurst, Elkstone, Fairford, Northleach, and Tewkesbury.


Transcribed from The Comprehensive Gazetteer of England & Wales, 1894-5

Archives and Libraries

Gloucestershire Archives
Clarence Row
Alvin Street
GLOUCESTER
GL1 3DW
Tel: +44 (0) 1452 425295
Fax:+44 (0) 1452 426378
Email:archives@gloucestershire.gov.uk

Bristol Record Office
'B' Bond Warehouse
Smeaton Road
Bristol
BS1 6XN
Tel: 0117-922 4224
Fax: 0117 922 4236
email:bro@bristol.gov.uk


Church Records

The complete set of Phillimore Marriages for Gloucestershire is online.

The Gloucestershire Parish Registers are available online at Ancestry.co.uk, in association with Gloucestershire Archives.

We have a database containing transcripts of marriage records for some parishes in Gloucestershire.

The parish registers for the Diocese of Bristol are available online at Ancestry, in association with Bristol Archives.


Civil Registration

For general information about Civil Registration (births, marriages and deaths) see the Civil Registration page.

List of Registration Districts in Gloucestershire from 1837 to 1974.


Directories & Gazetteers

The Historical Directories web site have a number of directories relating to Gloucestershire online, including:
Kelly's, Pigot, Slater, etc.

Pigot's Directory of Gloucestershire, 1842 is available to browse online.

We have transcribed the entry for Gloucestershire from the following:


Historical Geography

A listing of the Hundreds in Gloucestershire, with the parishes contained in them.


Land and Property

The Return of Owners of Land in 1873 for Gloucestershire is available to browse.


Maps

Old map of Gloucestershire circa 1848 (Samuel Lewis)

Old map of Gloucestershire circa 1895 (Gazetteer of England and Wales)


Newspapers and Periodicals

The British Newspaper Archive have fully searchable digitised copies of the following newspapers covering Gloucestershire online:


Parishes & places

Abinghall
Abston
Acton Turville
Adlestrop
Admington
Alderley
Alderton
Aldsworth
Alkington
Almondsbury
Alstone
Alveston
Alvington
Ampney Crucis
Ampney St Mary
Ampney St Peter
Arlingham
Ashchurch
Ashleworth
Ashley Hill
Ashton under Hill
Aston Somerville
Aston sub Edge
Avening
Awre
Badgington
Badgworth
Barnsley
Barnwood
Barton (Cirencester)
Batsford
Baunton
Becketsbury
Beckford
Berkeley
Berkeley Road
Beverstone
Bibury
Bishops Cleeve
Bishopston
Bishopswood
Bisley
Bitton
Blaisdon
Blaise Castle
Blakeney
Bledington
Boddington
Bourton on the Hill
Bourton on the Water
Bowbridge
Boxwell with Leighterton
Bradley
Bream or Breem
Bridgegate
Brimpsfield
Brimscombe
Bristol
Broad Campden
Broad Marston
Broad Oak
Broadwell
Brockhampton (Bishops Cleve)
Brockhampton (Sevenhampton)
Brockwear or Brockweir or Brooks Weir
Brockworth
Bromsberrow
Brookend
Brookthorpe
Buckland
Bulley
Burley
Bussage
Cainscross
Calmsden
Cam
Cambridge
Camp
Cartlet or Castlett
Caudle Green
Cerney Wick
Chalford
Charfield
Charingworth
Charlton (Tetbury)
Charlton Abbots
Charlton Kings
Chavenage or Chevenage
Chedworth
Cheltenham
Cherington
Chesterton
Childs Wickham
Chipping Campden
Chipping Sodbury
Church End
Churcham
Churchdown
Cinderford
Cirencester
Clapton
Clearwell
Cleeve (Bishops Cleeve)
Cleeve (Westbury on Severn)
Clifford Chambers
Clifton
Clopton
Coaley
Coalpit Heath
Coates
Coates (Winchcomb)
Cockbury
Codrington
Cold Ashton
Cold Aston
Coldwell
Coleford
Colesbourne
Coln Rogers
Coln St Aldwin
Coln St Dennis
Combend
Compton
Compton Abdale
Compton Greenfield
Condicote
Corndean
Corse
Cow Honeybourne
Cowcombe
Cowley
Cranham
Cromhall
Cubberley
Cugley
Daglingworth
Deerhurst
Deerhurst Walton
Didbrook
Didcot
Didmarton and Oldbury on the Hill
Ditchford
Dixton
Dodington
Donnington
Dorsington
Dowdeswell
Down Ampney
Down Hatherley
Downend (Horsley)
Downend (Mangotsfield)
Doynton
Driffield
Drybrook
Dudbridge
Dumbleton
Dunfield
Duntisbourne Abbots
Duntisbourne Rouse
Durdham Down
Dursley
Dymock
Dyrham and Hinton
Earthcott
East Back Court
East Dean
East Leach Martin
East Leach Turville
Eastcombe
Eastington
Eastington (Northleach)
Ebley
Ebrington
Edge
Edgeworth
Elberton
Elcomb
Elkstone
Elmore
Elmstone
Elmstree
English Bicknor
Epney
Etioe
Evington
Eyford
Fairford
Falfield
Farmcote
Farmington
Fiddington
Filton
Fishponds
Flaxley
Ford
Forest Green
Forest of Dean
Forthampton
Forwood
Framilode
Frampton
Frampton and Naunton
Frampton Cotterell
Frampton on Severn
France Lynch
Frenchay
Fretherne
Frocester
Gloucester
Gloucester and Berkeley Ship Canal
Gloucester and Bristol
Gorsley
Gotherington
Grafton
Grange Court
Great Badminton
Great Barrington
Great Rissington
Great Shurdington
Great Washbourne
Great Whitcombe
Greet
Gretton
Grovesend
Guiting Power
Guiting Temple
Hagloe
Hailes
Ham
Hambrook (Charlton Kings)
Hambrook (Winterbourne)
Hamfallow
Hampnett
Hanham
Hardwicke
Hardwicke (Elstowe)
Harescombe
Haresfield
Harford
Harnhill
Hartpury
Hasfield
Hasleton
Hatherop
Hawkesbury
Hawling
Haywards Field
Hempstead
Henbury
Henfield
Hewelsfield
Hidcote Bartrun
Hidcote Boyce
Highbury
Highleadon
Highnam
Hill
Hill End
Hillesley
Hinton
Hinton on the Green
Holbrook or Holybrook
Horfield
Horsley
Horton
Hucclecote
Huntingford
Huntley
Hwiecas or Huiccas
Hyde
Icomb
Ilmington
Inchbrook
Iron Acton
Itchington
Kemerton
Kempley
Kempsford
Kendalshire or Kendleshire
Kilcot
Killcott
Kimsbury
Kineton
Kingroad
Kings Stanley
Kingscote
Kingswood
Kingswood or Kingswood Hill
Kington
Lancaut
Langley
Larkstoke
Lasborough
Lassington
Lawrence Weston
Lea Bailey
Lechlade
Leckhampton
Leigh
Leonard Stanley
Linton
Little Badminton
Little Barrington
Little Dean
Little Rissington
Little Shurdington
Little Sodbury
Little Washbourne
Littleton
Littleworth (Gloucester)
Littleworth (Minchinhampton)
Littleworth (Rodborough)
Long Marston
Longborough
Longford
Longford St Catherine
Longhope
Longney
Lower and Upper Lypiatt
Lower Lemington
Lower Slaughter
Lower Swell
Lower Tockington
Lydbrook
Lydney
Maisemore
Maisey Hampton
Malswick
Mangotsfield
Marshfield
Matson
Maugersbury
Mawkins Hazels
Mayshill
Meon Hill
Mickleton
Minchinhampton
Minsterworth
Mircott or Murcott
Miserden
Mitcheldean
Moodmancote
Moorton or Moreton
Moreton in the Marsh
Moreton Valence
Mythe and Mythe Hook
Nailsworth
Nation
Naunton
Naunton (Winchcomb)
New Passage
Newent
Newington Bagpath
Newland
Newmarket
Newnham
Newton
Nibley
North Cerney
North Hamlet
North Nibley
Northleach
Northway
Northwick (Blockley)
Northwick (Henbury)
Norton
Notgrove
Nympsfield
Oakford
Oaklands
Oakle Street
Oakridge
Oddington
Old Sodbury
Oldbury on Severn
Oldland
Olveston
Over
Overton
Owlpen
Oxenhall
Oxenton
Ozleworth
Paganhill
Painswick
Pamington
Park
Parkend
Paulton
Pauntley
Pebworth
Pensylvania
Pilning
Pinnock and Hyde
Pitchcombe
Pool Hill
Postlip
Poulton
Prescott
Prestbury
Preston (Cirencester)
Preston (Ledbury)
Preston on Stour
Prinknash
Pucklechurch
Purton (Berkeley)
Purton (Lydney)
Quedgeley
Quenington
Quinton
Randwick
Rangeworthy
Redbrook
Redwick
Rendcombe
Rockhampton
Rockness
Rocks
Rodborough
Rodley
Rodmarton
Roel
Ruardean
Ruardean Hill and Ruardean Woodside
Rudford
Rudgeway
Ryeford
Saddlewood
Saintbury
Salperton
Sandford
Sandhurst
Sapperton
Saul
Sea Mills
Sedbury
Selsley
Sevenhampton
Severn and Wye and Severn Bridge Railway
Sezincote
Sharpness
Sheepscombe
Shepherdine
Sherborne
Shipton
Shipton Moyne
Shirehampton
Shortwood (Horsley)
Shortwood (Pucklechurch)
Siddington
Side or Syde
Simonds Hall and Combe
Sinwell and Bradley
Siston
Slimbridge
Sneedham Green
Sniggs End
Snowshill
South Cerney
South Hamlet
Southam
Southrop
Southwick
Spirringate
Spoonbed
St Briavels
St Catherine
St Cloe
St George
Standish
Stanley Pontlarge
Stanton
Stanway
Stapleton
Stapleton Road
Staunton
Staverton
Stinchcombe
Stoat
Stoke Bishop
Stoke Gifford
Stoke Orchard
Stone
Stonehouse
Stow on the Wold
Stowell
Stowick
Stratton
Stroud
Stroud End
Stroudwater Canal
Sudeley Manor
Sutgrove or Sudgrove
Swindon
Taddington
Taynton
Tetbury
Tewkesbury
Thames and Severn Canal
The Boyd
The Buckstone
The Cam
The Chelt
The Churn
The Colne
The Cotswolds
The Frome
The Haw
The Leach
The Severn
The Slad
The Stour
The Swiftgate
The Windrush
The Wye
Thornbury
Througham
Tibberton
Tidenham
Tirley
Toddington
Todenham
Torleton or Tarleton
Tormarton
Tortworth
Tredington
Tresham
Tuffley
Tunley
Turkdean
Tutshill
Twigworth
Two Mile Hill
Twyning
Tytherington
Uckington
Uley
Up Hatherley
Upleadon
Upper and Lower Easton
Upper Slaughter
Upper Swell
Upper Tockington
Upton St Leonard
Vale of Berkeley
Viney Hill All Saints
Walton Cardiff
Wapley and Codrington
Warmley
Watermoor
Webden or Wibdon
Welford on Avon
West Dean
West Littleton
Westall
Westbury on Severn
Westbury on Trym
Westcote
Westerleigh
Weston Birt
Weston on Avon
Weston Subedge
Weston Town
Westrip
Whaddon
Wheatenhurst
Whitecroft
Whitefield
Whiteshill
Whittington
Wick
Wick Rissington
Wickwar
Wickwick
Willersey
Willsbridge
Winchcombe
Windrush
Windsor Edge
Winson
Winstone
Winterbourne
Winterbourne Down
Withington
Wollastone
Woodchester
Woodmancote (Bishops Cleeve)
Woolstone
Woolstrop
Wootton
Wootton or Wotton St Mary Within
Wootton under Edge
Wormington
Wyndcliff
Yanworth
Yate
Yorkley

Population

The population of Gloucestershire in 1801 was 250,723; in 1811, 285,955; in 1821, 336,190; in 1831, 387,398; in 1841, 431,495; in 1851, 458,805; in 1861, 485,770; in 1871, 534,640; in 1881, 572,433; in 1891, 599,947; and in 1901 (including Bristol), 708,439, viz.:- Males, 331,558 and females, 376,881. The population of the administrative county and county boroughs of Bristol and Gloucester in 1911 was 736,097, viz.:- Males, 343,605; females, 392,492.


Visitations Heraldic

The Visitation of the county of Gloucester, 1623 is available on the Heraldry page.

Map of Gloucestershire