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Brompton (Scarborough), North Riding of Yorkshire

Historical Description

Brompton, a township, a village, and a parish in the N.R. Yorkshire. The township lies near the river Derwent, with a station called Sawdon on a branch of the N.E.R., and 8 miles SW by W of Scarborough, and it has a post, money order, and telegraph office under York. Acreage of the township, 5317; population, 702; of the ecclesiastical parish, 1405. The parish contains also the townships of Snainton, Troutsdale, and Sawdon. The manor is thought to have been a royal domain of the Northumbrian kings, who had a seat on an eminence, now called Castle Hill, and it afterwards passed to the Cliffords and the Cayleys. The living is a vicarage, and includes the parochial chapelry (unendowed) of Snainton, in the diocese of York; net value, £183. The church is spacious and elegant. The poet Wordsworth was married here in 1802. John de Brompton, the Cistercian monk, who wrote a history of England, is supposed to have been born here. There are Wesleyan and Primitive Methodist chapels.

Transcribed from The Comprehensive Gazetteer of England & Wales, 1894-5

Administration

The following is a list of the administrative units in which this place was either wholly or partly included.

Ancient CountyYorkshire 
Ecclesiastical parishBrompton All Saints 
Poor Law unionScarborough 

Any dates in this table should be used as a guide only.


Church Records

Findmypast, in conjunction with various Archives, Local Studies, and Family History Societies have the following parish records online for Brompton by Sawdon:

BaptismsBannsMarriagesBurials
1584-19141653-18811585-19301584-1980

Directories & Gazetteers

We have transcribed the entry for Brompton (Scarborough) from the following:


Land and Property

The Return of Owners of Land in 1873 for the North Riding of Yorkshire is available to browse.


Newspapers and Periodicals

The British Newspaper Archive have fully searchable digitised copies of the following North Riding newspapers online: