Lanhydrock, Cornwall

Historical Description

Lanhydrock, a parish in Cornwall, on the river Fowey, 1½ mile from Bodmin Road station on the G.W.R. Post town, Bodmin. Acreage, 1782; population, 192. The manor belonged to the Glynns and others, passed to the Robarteses, Earls of Radnor, and belongs now to Lord Robartes, a descendant of a younger branch of the Radnor family. Lanhydrock House, the seat of Lord Robartes, is an ancient mansion of the Tudor period, situated in a well-wooded park of 200 acres. The south wing and central portion of the house were almost wholly destroyed by fire in 1881, but these portions have been rebuilt in the same style as that of the destroyed work. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Truro; net value, £75. Patron, Lord Robartes. The church stands close to Lanhydrock House, has an embattled tower, and contains monuments of the Earls of Radnor; some new bells were hung in 1888, when the church was thoroughly restored. The churchyard contains an ancient granite cross.

Transcribed from The Comprehensive Gazetteer of England & Wales, 1894-5

Administration

The following is a list of the administrative units in which this place was either wholly or partly included.

Ancient County Cornwall
Ecclesiastical parish Lanhydrock St. Hydrock
Hundred Pyder
Poor Law union Bodmin

Any dates in this table should be used as a guide only.


Civil Registration

For general information about Civil Registration (births, marriages and deaths) see the Civil Registration page.


Directories & Gazetteers

We have transcribed the entry for Lanhydrock from the following:


Maps

Online maps of Lanhydrock are available from a number of sites:


Newspapers and Periodicals

The British Newspaper Archive have fully searchable digitised copies of the following Cornwall papers online:


Visitations Heraldic

We have a copy of The Visitations of Cornwall, by Lieut.-Col. J.L. Vivian online.