Holt, Denbighshire

Description

Holt, a small town, a township, and a parish in Denbighshire. The town stands on the river Dee, at the boundary with Cheshire, 4 miles ESE of Bossett station on the Wrex-ham and Chester branch of the G.W.R., 5 NE of Wrexham, and 8 S of Chester. It presents, with its environs, a picturesque appearance; was the Castrnm Legionis of the Romans, and the Castell Lleon of the Welsh; and a strong castle was built in the time of Edward I. It obtained a charter in 1410, and was previous to the unreformed Municipal Corporations Act governed by a mayor and two bailiffs. It unites with Denbigh, Euthin, and Wrexham, in sending a member to Parliament. It is connected by an old, massive stone bridge of ten arches with Farndon in Cheshire, and has a post and money order office under Wrexham; telegraph office, Farndon. In the centre of the village is an ancient market-cross, which was restored in 1876. The castle stood contiguous to the Dee, was built by Earl Warren, passed to the Stanleys, and was forfeited to the Crown in the reign of Henry VII. It was garrisoned in 1643 for Charles L, and taken and dismantled in 1645 by the Parliamentarians. It had a pentagonal outline flanked at the angles with towers, and fortified by bastions, was guarded on the land side by a deep fosse, and has left very scanty traces. The church is ancient, and has a handsome tower. Roman coins and other Roman relics have been found. Acreage of township, 2912; population, 1086. Fruit and garden vegetables are extensively grown. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of St Asaph; net value, -£231 with residence. Patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Winchester. There are Wesleyan and Presbyterian chapels.

Transcribed from The Comprehensive Gazetteer of England and Wales, 1894-5