Burntwood

BURNTWOOD, a chapelry district, in the parish of St. Michael, Lichfield, union of Lichfield, S. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 2 miles (W. by S.) from Lichfield; containing, with the hamlets of Edgehill and Woodhouses, 744 inhabitants. It lies on the eastern side of Cannock Chase, and comprises 2456a. 1r. 20p. of inclosed land, and about 1000 acres of common on the chase; 1716 acres are arable, 655 meadow and pasture, 12 woodland, 5 in pools and ponds, and 60 in homesteads. The land is in good cultivation. About 150 hands are employed in nail-making, but the population is mostly engaged in agricultural pursuits. There are several neat and pleasant mansions, one of which is Edgehill or Edial Hall, a square brick building with a cupola and balustrades, celebrated as the house in which the eminent lexicographer, Samuel Johnson, opened an academy in 1736; not meeting, however, with sufficient encouragement, he did not long continue here. At a short distance on the south of the chapelry passes the Wyrley and Essington canal. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patron, the Vicar of St. Mary's, Lichfield; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield: the glebe consists of about six acres, valued at £9 per annum, and a house. The chapel, dedicated to Christ, and erected in 1820, is a neat edifice of brick, with a square tower, and contains 250 sittings, whereof 140 are free. A school was endowed in 1765 by Mrs. Elizabeth Ball, with £600, of which £200 were expended in erecting the school-house, and the remainder was secured on land. Among other benefactions, the annual sum of £14 is paid out of a farm, as interest of two legacies left by the same lady, for the poor of the three hamlets comprising this township, and of the hamlet of Hammerwick.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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