Britford, or Burford (St. Peter)

BRITFORD, or Burford (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Alderbury, hundred of Cawden and Cadworth, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 1½ mile (S. E. by S.) from Salisbury; containing, with the hamlets of East Harnham and Longford, 878 inhabitants. A stream in the parish was cut for a canal in the reign of Charles II., to form a line of communication with Christchurch, in the county of Southampton; but owing to the shifting of the sand, it was never completed. The manufacture of horse-hair is carried on to a limited extent; and a large fair for sheep is held on Aug. 12th. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13; net income, £281; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury. The great tithes have been commuted for £700, and the glebe comprises 39 acres; the vicarial have been commuted for £350, and the glebe comprises one acre. The church, a spacious cruciform structure, with a central tower, contains a tomb considered by some to be that of the Duke of Buckingham, who was beheaded by Richard III.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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