Appleby, Leicestershire

Description
Appleby, a village, a township, and a parish on the confines of Leicester and Derby. The village stands 1 1/2 mile WSW of the Mease river and the Ashby-de-la- Zouch Canal, and about 2 miles from Measham railway station. It has a post, money order, and telegraph office under Atherstone. It is sometimes called Appleby-Magna or Great Appleby, while a hamlet a little S of it, in the same parish, is called Appleby-Parva or Little Appleby. The parish comprises 2853 acres; population, 657. Appleby Hall is the seat of the Moore family, who are lords of the manor. The living is a rectory in the diocese of Peterborough; value, £800 with residence. The church is a handsome structure with a spire, and has some good painted glass. There are three dissenting chapels and an endowed grammar-school-the latter founded in 1697 by Sir John Moore, lord mayor of London. Endowed income of the grammar-school, £300 per annum.

Transcribed from The Comprehensive Gazetteer of England and Wales, 1894-5

Church Records

The parish register dates from the year 1572.


Owners of Land

A full transcript of the Return of Owners of Land in 1873 for Leicestershire is online.


Places of worship

The church of St. Michael is a building of stone in the Decorated style, consisting of chancel of three bays, nave of five bays, aisles and a noble embattled western tower, with spire rising to a height of about 135 feet, and containing a clock and 6 bells, the tenor dated 1619, the rest being of later date: the east window, erected in 1879, and others are memorials: in the vestry is a marble tomb, with recumbent effigies of great size of a knight in armour and a lady, without name or date, but supposed to represent Sir Edmund de-Appleby and his wife: the chancel contains mural monuments to the Rev. A. Mould, a former rector (1683), the Rev. Thomas Mould (1642), and to Elizabeth, wife of Edward Dawson (1765): there is a similar memorial in the south aisle to the Rev. Thomas Mould, many years master of Appleby Grammar School (1796), and affixed to one of the pillars in the same aisle is a marble tablet to the Rev. James Gresley (1766): there are 50 sittings.

There is a General Baptist chapel, erected in 1820, with 100 sittings, and a Particular Baptist chapel.