Ashleworth, Gloucestershire

Description
Ashleworth, a village and a parish in Gloucestershire, at a ferry on the north bank of the river Severn, 5 miles N of Gloucester, under which it has a post office, and at which is the money order office. Acreage, 1766; population, 450. The living is a rectory in the diocese of Gloucester and Bristol; value, £160. Patron, the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol. The church is a fine edifice, chiefly Perpendicular, with some Early English and Decorated portions, and has an embattled tower with a spire. It was restored in 1869. It possesses many features of unusual interest-the north wall is pure Saxon, and is one of the most complete specimens of this work in England. It contains also a 14th century rood screen and loft. The original royal arms, time of Edward VI., are at the west end. The pulpit is an unusually fine one of carved oak, date 1635. There is a 14th century preaching cross in the churchyard in perfect preservation. Adjoining the church is a most perfect and beautiful tithe barn, and an Augustinian monastery with a very fine timbered hall, some interesting frescoes, and an effigy of Henry VI. The manor formed part of the possessions of the Earls of Berkeley, and was given to the Augustinian monastery at Bristol in the time of Edward II. Foscombe, the principal residence, is a fine mansion with a lofty tower, which commands an extensive view. The Old Vicarage is interesting for its antiquity.

Transcribed from The Comprehensive Gazetteer of England and Wales, 1894-5

Maps

Old maps of Ashleworth are available on the old-maps.co.uk site, and a current map is available on the Streetmap.co.uk site.


Visitations Heraldic

The Visitation of the county of Gloucester, 1623 is available on the Heraldry page.