Kea, Cornwall

Description
Kea or St Kea, a parish in Cornwall. The parish lies 3 miles from Truro station on the G.W.R., is bounded on the E by the river Fal, on the N by Kenwyn, on the W by Gwennap, and contains parts of the chapelries of Baldhu, Chacewater, and Mithian. Post town, Truro. Acreage, ? 747 of land and 174 of water and foreshore; population of the civil parish, 2103; of the ecclesiastical, 705. The manor belongs to Viscount Falmouth. Killiow is a chief residence. Carlyon was the birthplace of the knight Sir Tristram. There are some barrows. The manor or parish was known at Domesday as Landegey, and it is alleged to have taken the name of Kea from a saint who is fabled to have come from Ireland in a granite boat, but it may have taken the name from Kea the Virgin or from Pope Caius or St Kew. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Trnro; value, £160 with residence. Patron, the Bishop of Truro. The church contains paintings of Mrs Gwatkin of Killiow, niece of Reynolds, and also contains a copy of a letter from "King Charles I. written from his camp at Sudeley Castle, 10 September, 1643, thanking the people of Cornwall for their services to the Crown. A new church was erected in 1894-95. The tower of the old church still stands, and a chapelry church, erected in 1858, is beside it. There are Wesleyan and Bible Christian chapels, and almshouses with £44 a year, also one of the oldest Friends' meeting-houses in the country at Come-to-Good. In the district are several mines, but none of them have been worked for some years.

Transcribed from The Comprehensive Gazetteer of England and Wales, 1894-5

Maps

Old maps of Kea are available on the old-maps.co.uk site, and a current map is available on the Streetmap.co.uk site.


Visitations Heraldic

We have a copy of The Visitations of Cornwall, by Lieut.-Col. J.L. Vivian online.