Marston, Cheshire

Description
Marston, a village, a township, and an ecclesiastical parish in Great Budworth parish, Cheshire. The village stands on the Trent and Mersey Canal, 1 mile NNE of Northwich, and has a post, money order, and telegraph office under Northwich. The township comprises 841 acres; population, 961. Salt mines and extensive salt manufactories are here. Marston old mine has been worked since about 1777, has an excavated area of 85 acres, is 336 feet deep, forms a vast chamber supported by pillars of salt 60 feet square and 15 high, was visited by the Emperor Nicholas of Russia in 1844, and then illuminated with upwards of 10,000 lights, and used for a banquet; and was visited by distinguished members of the British Association in 1854, when it was again splendidly illuminated, and when nearly 1000 persons descended into it in one day. The Marston Hall mine has an excavated area of 40 acres, and is the largest mine in the trade. The ecclesiastical parish was constituted in 1874, and includes part of Wincham township; population, 1671. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Chester; net value, £202 with residence. Patron, Christ Church, Oxford. The church was erected in 1874.

Transcribed from The Comprehensive Gazetteer of England and Wales, 1894-5

Maps

Old maps of Marston are available on the old-maps.co.uk site, and a current map is available on the Streetmap.co.uk site.


Visitations Heraldic

The Visitation of Cheshire, 1580 is available on the Heraldry page.